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Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings: Use the Strategies of Champions to Enhance Your Performance

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

Elite sportspeople think and feel in specific ways to achieve outstanding physical performances. Learn how to use the same champion thoughts and feelings to change negative thinking, non-constructive feelings, and limiting behaviours and enhance your performance - as a coach and as an athlete.

THE MENTAL EDGE
Your performance is profoundly influenced by your thinking - by the things you imagine and say to yourself. Thoughts are powerful - thoughts make things happen. Thoughts are the building blocks from which you create your beliefs, attitudes, behaviours, and every aspect of your performance in your sport, or at work. Every thought you have affects you in some way - either empowering you, or limiting you. There are no 'neutral' thoughts.

Yet few people recognise the enormous power of their moment to moment thinking, and fewer still actually use this awareness in their daily life.

Every performance starts in your mind. The best performances occur when you take control of your performance by taking control of your thinking. All control begins by taking control of the thoughts you think. Champions give themselves a mental edge by standing guard at the door of their mind - by taking control of their thinking, and by deliberately choosing to focus on the positive.

MASTERING YOUR MIND
Everyone knows they're supposed to 'be positive' - to think positively, and to discourage negativity. Yet for many people thoughts just seem to 'happen' before they know about it! People tell me all the time, "I can't help it. I just automatically do it!"

At which point I tell them that's a cop out, and a load of rubbish. Thoughts don't 'just happen' to you - you think them! There can be no escaping the fact that you choose your thoughts - how else could they get there?

Yet even knowing this, some people still indulge in negative thinking, and problem focus - rather than looking for solutions and always expecting the best for themselves.

Part of the problem is, of course, that negative thinking has become a habit - not only for individuals, but for the society in general. Like any habit, it takes effort and willingness to change.

So the issue for many people is to be personally convinced of the detriment of negative thinking on their performance and in their lives, and of the enormous advantages that accrue to those who continually focus on positive, possibility thoughts.

IMPORTANCE OF FEELINGS
However, feelings are just as important to success. Your performance at work; in your relationships; in education; in sport; in fact, in every area of your life, is profoundly influenced by your feelings, isn't it? How you feel affects how well you perform. Your emotional states influence your thinking, your behaviour, your tone of voice, your posture, and even your health.

But, like thoughts, feelings don't 'just happen' to you - feelings are choices. Champions recognise this and choose their feelings. Feelings that empower them, and allow them to fully utilise their physical prowess and mental skills.

Champions have learned how to choose the states they live in.

HOW MANY GOOD FEELINGS DO YOU HAVE ?
How many good feelings do you have? And how much time in a day do you spend feeling good? Likewise, how many bad feelings can you identify ..... and how much time do you spend in a day feeling bad? Think about it for a minute.

If you're like a lot of people, you will probably only be able to think of a few good feelings - but lots of bad ones! For instance, a short list of bad feelings might run like this:

Worried; Depressed; Sad; Frustrated; Unconfident; Uptight; Angry; Tired; Tense; Bad; Embarrassed; Pressured; Jealous; Anxious; Unmotivated; Lonely; Weak; Victimised; Sorry-for-self; Nervous; Powerless; Self righteous; Apathetic; Trapped; Unloved; Pitiful; Heavy; Procrastinating; Lousy; Vindictive; Down; Put-upon; Rushed; Sick; Tentative; Bashful; Grumpy; Hesitant; Confused; Stressed; Uncertain; Uncreative; Pensive; Lost; Betrayed; Itchy; Spaced-out; In Crisis; Directionless; Stuck; Impatient; Hurt; Unprepared; Clumsy; Bored; Sullen; Slow; Fragile; Un-coordinated; Guilty; Greedy; Anguished; Fearful; Selfish; Regretful; Grieving; Isolated; Withdrawn; and Sleepy .... to name just a few!

I think that many people spend more time in the day feeling either bad, or neutral, than they do actively feeling good feelings!

CHAMPION FEELINGS
What do champions feel? How do they use their emotional states to generate excellence in themselves? What champion feelings do they choose? I've listed some below that I've identified in peak performers. Perhaps you can think of others. Why not choose, right now, to experience one of the following champion feelings :

  • Joy - a feeling of intense happiness
  • Enthusiasm - a feeling of being fully alive and energised
  • Purpose - a feeling of certainty and direction in your life
  • Determination - a feeling of being fully committed to a task or goal
  • Courage - a feeling of strength in the face of adversity or risk
  • Focus - a feeling of pinpoint concentration
  • Love - a feeling of caring, and giving of yourself
  • Adventure - a feeling of excitement and challenge
  • Momentum - a feeling of moving to a destination
  • Belonging - a feeling of connection to others
  • Timing - a feeling of being in perfect sync with outside forces

Every instant, you're creating or manufacturing some kind of feeling - whether it be a negative feeling like indifference, anger, sullenness, apathy or unconfidence; or a positive feeling like joy, confidence, enthusiasm, excitement, conviction, or some of the others I've listed above.

The trouble is, that many people simply don't recognise, or label, their feeling states. As a consequence, their behaviour is being directed unconsciously - by feelings they are not even aware of! Because your behaviour is profoundly affected by your feelings, if you don't really know or are aware of what you're feeling - how can you be in charge of your behaviour, or your performances? In order to be in charge of your personal performance, you want to be aware of your feeling states, and maintain that awareness from moment to moment.

Take a moment, right now, and recognise what you're feeling - right now, right this instant! What are you feeling, right now, as you read this article? Don't dismiss the question, or dodge the answer by saying "I'm feeling OK" or "all right", or "nothing", or "I don't know". Find out! Get in touch with yourself, with your feelings, and describe what you're currently experiencing. Put a label on your feelings.

LABELLING YOUR FEELINGS
It's important to label your feelings. If you don't put labels on them you'll find them difficult to change if they're negative, and you also won't understand what is directing your behaviours! Once you've identified a feeling or emotional state, then you can go about changing it if it's disempowering or counter-productive. In addition, if it's a positive and useful feeling or emotional state, then you can actively enhance and amplify it and make it even more effective and powerful in your life.

I think it's so important to have a vocabulary of champion feelings - because if you can't conceptualise or put a name to a feeling, how can you ever experience it? If you don't identify a feeling, then you won't ever feel it - or understand what it is that you're feeling, and how to use it. If a feeling is not in your language, then you won't make use of it in your life.

Why impoverish yourself by limiting your range of positive emotions to just a few? Practice experiencing champion feelings, and use them in your life.



About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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Power Motivation Techniques: How to Effectively Motivate Yourself & Others

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

The secret to motivation is the way you communicate - with yourself, and others. Communicate in a particular way and all you'll get is resistance and apathy; change your communication style and you will get enthusiasm and positive action - from yourself and in those you coach!

WHAT IS MOTIVATION?
What is motivation, and where does it come from? How do we 'get motivated', and how can we motivate others in an effective manner? How come some people always seem to have so much motivation and energy, while others struggle with apathy and lack of direction?

Put simply, motivation is an energy - an energy to do, to accomplish. In order to understand this energy a little better, take a few moments now to think of a specific time when you were really motivated - a time when you felt that energy to do, strongly. Take the time to remember where you were, what you were thinking, and how you motivated yourself. How did you communicate with yourself in order to get motivated?

You will no doubt have found that you used one of two simple motivation strategies - either a positive motivation strategy, or a negative motivation strategy. Now in this context 'negative' doesn't necessarily mean 'bad', and positive doesn't necessarily mean 'good'.

I define negative motivation as a form of motivation that moves you away from a negative happening or experience - moving you away from something you don't want to happen. The essential motivating part of negative motivation is the thought of something 'bad' happening. Negative motivation often comes from an external source with the threat of some kind of punishment if you don't do something. For example, your parents telling you you have to clean up your room, or mow the lawn, or you won't be allowed to go out on Saturday night. Or your teacher saying you must have the assignment handed in by Monday morning, otherwise you'll get detention. Or your coach shouting that you should concentrate harder or you'll never make the team. And so you motivate yourself to do whatever it is, because you don't want those negative consequences to happen

Of course, you can also motivate yourself in this negative way - for example, leaving early for work because you don't want to be late; doing your homework assignments because you don't want to fail; watching the foods you eat because you don't want to get fat.

POSITIVE MOTIVATION
In contrast, positive motivation is a form of motivation which moves you toward a positive happening or experience, moving you toward something you do want to happen, and the essential motivating part of positive motivation is the thought of this 'good' experience or result happening. Some examples of positive motivation are someone working out at the gym four times a week because they like the way they look and feel when they work out regularly; or working to a study timetable because you want a good grade; or putting in 100% effort in training because you want to be in the starting lineup for the game on the weekend.

It's useful to recognise that while both negative and positive motivation can have important roles in motivating us to avoid personal danger, get out of bed in the morning, earn a living, keep healthy and fit, achieve recognition in our sport, and so on, there is a significant difference in the consequences of using each type of motivation in your life.

Negative motivation can result in excessive anxiety and tension, while positive motivation tends to positively energise and arouse you. Negative motivation causes you to think about what you don't want, while positive motivation gets you focused on what you do want. Having a positive focus, particularly as a sportsperson is just so important - because we move toward what we think about. I like to say that human beings are like guided missiles, and the guidance system of us is the thoughts we think. Think about not wanting to go into the water trap or the bunker when you're about to hit your iron off the tee, and that's often where your end up! Think about not wanting to get nervous and mess up the important speech, and that's often just what you do! Think about not being late for that important meeting, and often everything seems to conspire to make you late!

We move toward what we think about, so it's important to imagine and picture what we want rather than what we don't want. It's been identified that the top performers in any sport are invariably more positively motivated than negatively motivated - what motivates them are strong desires for their dreams and goals, and this is one reason why having goals (discussed in my previous article) is so important.

HOW DO YOU COMMUNICATE?
One way to identify your current motivation strategy is to simply pay attention to the words and images you use when you're motivating yourself, or others. What words do you use when you want to motivate yourself, or someone else, to do something? How do you communicate with yourself and others to achieve motivation?

If you're saying to yourself things like, "I have to go to training today"; or "I've got to improve my fitness"; or "I must concentrate harder"; or "I ought to practice more"; then you're using a negative motivation strategy, and you're not managing yourself as effectively as you could.

Remember, positive motivation grows out of desire and wanting - not from should's, have to's, ought's, and must's. I believe the more you can choose to live your life and do every task from a "I'm doing it because I choose to and want to" way of thinking and talking to yourself, the better your life works, and the more successful you are in the long run. Working in this way with yourself, you manage yourself better and you don't get 'resistance' from yourself because you feel forced to do something again your will. Remember how you felt when your parents said you had to help with the dishes, or had to mow the lawn, or had to do some other chore, when you wanted to watch television or play with your friends? You felt pushed and of course you resisted, and as a result your heart wasn't in it when you did the chore, was it? The same thing happens if you communicate to yourself in that way - if you use "have to's", "ought to's", "should's" and "must's", then you'll find yourself unconsciously resisting yourself, even if it's a task that's worthwhile, for a cherished goal you want to achieve.

The thing to realise and understand is that often in sport the only thing that keeps a competitor going is their heart - and if your heart isn't in something, you'll eventually give up. Communicating with yourself using negative motivation language is a sure way to lose heart, and you're too good for that.

So from now on, every time you hear yourself say "should", or "ought to", or "must" or "have to" about any task that you're undertaking ..... stop, and deliberately change your language to 'want to". You want to "want to"! Rather than should, ought to, have to and must, use words like want to, like to, desire to, love to. You want to do this to enhance your motivation!

Of course, if you're a coach, or manager, or personal trainer, or teacher wanting to build motivation in others, then this information is doubly important, isn't it? Listen to how you've been talking to your staff, players, students or clients lately. Have you been building "want to's" based on strongly desired goals and dreams, or have you been telling them they "should" train harder, or "have to" concentrate more, or "must" be more determined to win?

SIX TASKS
I encourage you to try it right this instant. Right now, think of six tasks that are on your agenda to do this week. They might be work tasks, an assignment due for some course you're doing, home chores, or training for your sport - it doesn't matter. As you think of each task, rather than say to yourself, "I have to do such-and-such", think instead: "I want to get that report to my boss by Friday morning"; or " I want to go to the gym three times this week"; or "I want to practice my chipping for an hour three afternoons this week"; or I want to get the washing and ironing done tomorrow". I now use this process for everything I choose to do - including wanting to put in my tax return on time!

Did you notice the difference in the way you felt about the tasks when you changed the language you used? You would have felt more relaxed and at ease about doing the tasks, and felt more 'motivated' to do them.

MOTIVATING OTHERS
I recently read that because so many people are so used to motivating themselves negatively, in order to be most effective in motivating others, first state what you DON'T want, and then state what you DO want - in the same sentence.

What is important is the sequence in which the negative and positive aspects of the directions are given. For instance, if I were giving instruction to a football or basketball team about improving on their defence, notice how the order of what I say influences your response. Which of these two statements is more appealing to you? :

"This time, let's start aggressively and maintain concentration throughout the entire match. No missed tackles, fumbles, or sloppy passing." OR "This time, no missed tackles, fumbles, or sloppy passing. Let's start aggressively and maintain concentration throughout the entire match."

Most people find the second statement more useful, because you are made aware of what to avoid, and then given a positive direction or goal at the end - which is what remains most clearly in your mind. Of course, in my opinion, an even better alternative would be a pure positive motivation statement such as : "This time, make every tackle, hold on to the ball, and pass accurately. Let's start aggressively and maintain concentration throughout the entire match."

Why accede to others' negativity at all? Let's teach them how to be positive!



About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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The Power of Commitment: How to Develop Irresistible Momentum

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)


BUILDING CHAMPION MOMENTUM
The key to your achieving success in your chosen sport, or any endeavour for that matter, will not be as a result of a different diet, or through a new cross training regimen, or with the latest technologically advanced running shoes, or the latest software package, or gee-whiz laptop computer - it will be a result of your ability to establish and maintain physical, emotional and mental momentum toward the realisation of your personal vision.

Understanding, and employing, the principles of making things happen allows you to turn a vision from an attractive dream into a fulfilling reality - by chunking it down into achievable goals and action plans. In this article I will show you how to generate irresistible personal momentum to turn your dreams into a reality.

MAKE YOUR SPORTS DREAMS A GOLD MEDAL REALITY
After you have committed yourself to a personal vision which you feel truly passionate about achieving - the next step is to go about achieving it! Having dreams is important - but lot's of people have dreams, yet they never achieve them. So how do you turn a dreams into a reality?

The most important thing is to understand how you got to be where you are now - because where you are, now, was at one time just a dream wasn't it? Isn't it true that there was a time, for instance, when you hadn't even started playing or competing in your chosen sport, or working in your current career - and to reach the level or position you're currently at now was just a dream?

How did you make that dream happen? Essentially you made a decision to do it; to follow a particular path.

Your decisions precede all your actions and so determine who you become. Everything in your life, including your current sports performances and your current level of financial and career success, is determined by the decisions you have made, and are making right now. Your decisions determine what you think, how you feel, what you do, and who you become.

DECISION POWER
If someone is achieving greater success than you, the reason is simply that they have made different decisions.

Different decisions about their approach to training and how they spend their time; different decisions about how they respond to obstacles and problems; different decisions about who they hang around with; and especially, different decisions about what they want to achieve in their sport, career, and personal life.
Unfortunately, most people don't make these kinds of decisions consciously - they just hope they do well, and then wish they had done better! However, hopes and wishes are not good enough to succeed at a high level. If you don't consciously make these kinds of decisions - about what level of performance you expect of yourself, and what you want in your life - then you've really decided to let other people, or the whims of the environment, direct your destiny.

Do you like to think that your life is controlled by someone else? Yet I hear outside excuses from people all the time about why they haven't achieved more in their sport, in their career, or financially. "I'm not the right build"; "I'm too young"; "I haven't had enough experience"; "I haven't got the opportunities or contact they have"; "I don't have enough time"; and so on.

You've heard similar excuses, and perhaps you've used some of them yourself - I know I used to, and I still occasionally fall into this trap. Yet I soon realise, as you do, that these are just conditions - and it's not the conditions in your life that hold you back, but rather the decisions you make! Your performance is determined by what you decide to do, given whatever conditions you currently have in your life - that's what makes the difference.

Some people are born with a natural sports physique, have large financial resources, or live in an ideal environment. However, lots of those people, even given these advantages don't achieve their potential, do they? They're not as successful as they might be.

However there are others who come from a poor background with physical, environmental and social limitations who throw off the bonds of those conditions to achieve sporting, career, and financial successes way beyond expectations.

How do they do it? Simply by making committed decisions. A committed decision has enormous power to positive affect your performance.

REAL DECISIONS
For your decisions to make a real difference in your life, they want to be true decisions. Many people use the word decision to mean preference - things they'd like to have happen, or hope or wish to happen, rather than real decisions about things they will make happen.

When you make a true decision, it engenders a feeling of firm commitment to make it happen, leaving no choice for any other option. For instance, if you really decide to give up smoking, then you'll do it. If you really decide to reduce your golf handicap to single figure over the next twelve months, then you'll do it. If you truly decide increase your monthly income, then you'll find a way to make it happen.

Most people just list preferences rather than make committed decisions: "I hope I get the promotion"; "I'd like to earn more money this year"; or "I hope I'm selected for the team". These are just wish lists, and have no power to positively change your life or enhance your sporting performances.

MAKE YOUR GOALS DECISIONS
Right now think of a true decision you've made recently - something you decided on, and followed through with. Perhaps a decision to move house, take up a new job, start some kind of study, or maybe even the decision to buy this magazine! Notice how you thought about it, and identify the exact moment of decision, when you said to yourself, "Yes, do it".
Think of something now that you haven't made a definite decision about yet. Notice how you think about that, and compare the differences in what you see, hear, and feel to the time you made a definite decision. You'll find that you think about the two experiences very differently.

How have you been thinking about your sports goals and dreams? Do you think about them more like the time you made a definite decision, ...... or more like something you're just 'considering' but haven't really committed yourself to yet? Think about achieving your dreams in the same way that you think about buttoning your shirt, or driving your car ...... simple, easy, no questions - I'll just do it.

COMMIT TO ACTION
Remember, true decisions are always followed by actions.

If you truly decide to get a new job, you'll check out the papers on Saturday morning, or take your resume to an employment agency. If you truly decide to end a relationship, you'll confront your partner and talk about it, or you'll pack your bags! And if you make a true decision to play to a higher standard in your sport, or reach a cherished sports goal, then you'll do something about it - you'll take some action. Until the point of action, it's just been something you've been 'considering' - action makes it a true decision.

When you make a definite commitment to a particular decision, it also unlocks the energy within you to achieve it. I'm sure you've had the experience of agonising over a decision about something for weeks or even months - you know how such indecision can totally sap your drive, because you have no clear direction. However, as soon as you've hopped off the fence and decided one way or the other, you're able to start moving again.

So, right now, you could use the power of a true decision to change your life. The question is, will you? The motivation, the power, the energy to succeed comes from making committed decisions. Why not make some for yourself, today?

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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The Power of 'Will'

By Jeffrey Hodges

To successfully attain a lofty goal in elite sport – or in any endeavour for that matter – you want to understand and fully appreciate the different levels of motivation and personal ambition, and the driving force underpinning all successful achievement.

Volition – human WILL – is the power that nurtures and maintains all of our physical, emotional and mental actions and behaviours. Even the tiniest movement of the body, or any act of thinking first begins with the will to do so. Without volition we cannot walk, talk, think or work, and even our emotions involve a degree of volition ... to feel anger, or compassion, or boredom, or confidence you first must 'decide' to feel that emotion, rather than another.

So how is your will power?

An important aspect of will is that will involves decision . Ask yourself ... have you decided to achieve your goal, or is it just an idle wish or vague hope that you get it? Have you decided not only on the end result, but also on the process of getting there .... And have you also decided to accept and to do what is required?

Examine your thoughts, feelings and actions regarding your goals. Do you have a clear vision of the exact future you want? Are your goals just something you hope will happen to you? Are they mere wishes based on luck and good fortune coming your way? Is the force of your desire for them easily extinguished by setbacks, or distracted by other activities or people? Have you acted and persisted in your actions in the face of the inevitable challenges, criticisms, doubts and setbacks that have come along? Do you learn and adapt after each attempt and action step? Are you enjoying the journey ?

To merely 'hope' for something is to be a passive victim of the will of others, or to want to be 'lucky' that the whim of circumstance falls your way. To wish for something begins to awaken the will, but wishing is the weakest form of human will, for it is primarily in the imagination and rarely leads to success.

A desire is a stronger wish, which starts to not just engage the mind but also the emotions, and is often followed by fitful efforts to bring it into action... however specific desires can quickly fade or be replaced by other competing desires.

An intention or a determination to act is a more powerful act of will in that it is a strong desire expressed through action for the accomplishment of a specific purpose .... Such an intention however can often be discouraged by challenges, setbacks, opposition or failure to achieve the desired goal as expected or after a few unsuccessful attempts.

The most powerful form of will is a volition – which is inspired by a vividly imagined future outcome, fuelled by a passionate desire to achieve it, and which involves a continuous series of dynamic, undiscourageable determinations and acts until the result is attained.

The mantra of volitive action is "will and act until victory is attained". No matter how challenging the goal, or how impossible it may seem at the moment, the volitive athlete never stops repeating determined, conscious acts of intention to achieve it as long as they live.

Will gradually evolves as we grow, from the automatic 'physiological will' of the new born baby that cries as it tries to remove the discomfort of the first painful breath as the lungs begin their lifetime activity for the first time. The young child then develops 'unthinking will' – that of unquestioningly following and obeying its mother, up until about the age of 2 – 3 years of age at which time it develops its own sense of self, and begins to express resistance when its desires conflict with parental or others' instructions.

In this first act of obstinacy, the child has developed the next stage of its evolving will – that of 'blind will'. The will at this stage is called 'blind' will because if is not usually guided by wisdom... but rather the will is used in an explosive and reckless manner, rarely pursuing any worthwhile purpose and wasting energy and effort on ungoverned appetites and fleeting pastimes.

Eventually, with experience and through recognising the consequences and futility of blind will and the application of discrimination, the youth learns 'thinking will'. If one's thinking will is made to revolve around a definite purpose, it becomes volition.

A powerful will, by its own dynamic force, creates a way for the fulfillment of its intention – understand that the human will is an electromagnetic power that broadcasts vibrations into the ether and nature responds accordingly by creating favourable circumstances.

While the development of will for one's own personal aspirations is important, it is helpful to remember that will derives strength from honest and lofty purposes and through collaboration with others in a desire to advance the good of all.

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How Mentally Fit Are You? Take the Sports Optimism Test Now.

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

Introduction
To succeed in sport, business, education, or wherever, you really want to have an unshakeable positive mental attitude; the attitude and ability to continually focus on the solution and the goal rather than problems, obstacles or mistakes.

What we call optimism.

Optimism equates with personal, business, educational and sporting success. People who are the most optimistic are usually the most successful - and this is particularly true in sport. So one measure of mental 'fitness' is how optimistic your are.

Explanatory Style
Cognitive psychologists suggest that an individual athlete's "explanatory style" is a significant factor in influencing sports performance. Individuals with an optimistic explanatory style consistently outperform those with a pessimistic explanatory style. [Seligman, (1990); Hanrahan & Grove (1990)]. Their work is based on 'attribution theory' - ie. on how people explain 'good' and 'bad' events that happen in their lives. An individual's explanatory style can be used to determine their level of optimism or pessimism - and as a consequence, their performance potential in sport.

To determine explanatory style (and hence optimism or pessimism), psychologists typically employ an Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ) to evaluate various "dimensions" such as Personalisation (Ps), Permanence (Pm) and Pervasiveness (Pv) about both negative and positive events which has been suggested ultimately determine optimism or pessimism in explanatory style [Seligman (1990)]. Others, [Hanrahan, Grove and Hattie (1989), Hanrahan and Grove (1990)], have likewise developed attributional style questionnaires measuring dimensions of internality, stability, controllability, globality and intentionality.

Most such questionnaires use very general scenarios and are not particularly sports specific, consequently, the following short questionnaire was developed as a sports contextualised style of ASQ. Using the following short Sports ASQ coaches can obtain a very general guide to their athletes' explanatory style, and establish relative levels of optimism and pessimism between individual players. Such information may be of use in both the recruitment and selection of players (when everything else is about equal choose the more optimistic recruit), and in identifying existing players who may benefit from specific psychological skills training to develop more optimism - and hence improve sports performance.

When using the following questionnaire with players, recognise that it is a simplistic questionnaire - not a proper psychological diagnostic tool - and should be used as a guide only. Should a specific player be identified as pessimistic by this questionnaire, further professional guidance should be sought in establishing the veracity of the result, and in the specific identification and design of a cognitive training program to develop more optimism.

Ideally, rather than a psychological profiling tool, the questionnaire should be viewed and used as a way to encourage players to "think about their thinking" - and to establish a dialogue among players and between players and coaching staff as to the types of thinking which lead to good sports performances.

For those who wish to explore the concepts of optimism and explanatory stye in greater detail, there are validated psychological tools (such as the Seligman Attributional Style Questionnaire) which I recommend and which can be used for specific psychological profiling. For more information about these, contact Sportsmind and I can refer you to appropriate organisations and professionals who have the skills and expertise in this area.


SPORTS OPTIMISM QUESTIONNAIRE

There are no 'right' or 'wrong' answers. Circle only one response per question, and answer every question even though the situation may never have happened to you. Read each description and imagine it happening to you; then choose the response that is most closest to how you would think in that situation.

PmG
1. Situation: You are asked to replace a player in a higher grade who is injured :
A: I am good enough to play in the higher grade.
B: I have filled in occasionally before when needed.

2. Situation: You win a tournament / important game :
A: I was feeling unbeatable that day.
B: I always put a lot of effort into my training.

3. Situation: You do exceptionally well in an interview for a coaching position :
A: I always perform well in interviews.
B: I felt very relaxed and confident in the interview.

4. Situation: Despite being new to the team, you are put in the starting lineup :
A: I was in top form that day.
B: I am enthusiastic and try hard.

5. Situation: You invite a few team mates over for a party, and it's a raging success :
A: I host great parties.
B: I was particularly friendly that night.

PmB
6. Situation: You forget to go to training after a long weekend :
A: My mind was still on holiday that day.
B: I always forget when my routine is disrupted.

7. Situation: You lose your cool with the referee during a game :
A: That referee is biased against me.
B: He / She didn't referee fairly in the game.
8. Situation: You put on a lot of weight over Christmas and have trouble getting back
to your peak weight and fitness :
A: The diet I tried didn't work.
B: It's always hard to get back into training after a break.

9. Situation: Your coach says something that hurts your feelings :
A: He / She is always very cutting with criticism.
B: He / She was in a grumpy mood and took it out on me.

10. Situation: You've been feeling very tired lately :
A: I've been really busy this week.
B: I don't get a chance to relax.

PvG
11. Situation: You successfully resuscitate a person who was pulled from the surf :
A: I stay calm in a crisis.
B: I'm trained in first aid.

12. Situation: Your team is losing, and the coach asks your advice :
A: I know some good plays for pressure situations.
B: I always keep an overall perspective on the game.

13. Situation: You win a 'most improved player' award :
A: I was the most improved player.
B: I had important wins near the end of the season.

14. Situation: Your coach tells you you are at peak fitness level :
A: I stuck to my training program.
B: I'm very fitness conscious.

15. Situation: A team member comments on your confidence :
A: I am a confident person.
B: I've been playing well lately.

PvB
16. Situation: You perform poorly at an event for which you've been training hard :
A: The competition was fierce that day.
B: I'm not a natural athlete.
17. Situation: The coach says you're not working hard enough :
A: I'm not as motivated as everyone else in the team.
B: I have been slacking off a bit lately.

18. Situation: Your romantic partner breaks it off with you :
A: I didn't communicate well with him / her.
B: I'm too moody.

19. Situation: You are in charge of a team training session while your coach is sick, and
no one enjoys the training :
A: I'm not very good at coaching.
B: I didn't put much thought into the coaching session.

20. Situation: You forget to go to an unscheduled training session.
A: I forgot to check my diary that day.
B: I've got a bad memory for things like that.

Marking
Evaluate your answers using the following system:

1. Start by looking at every odd numbered question, and mark an 'A' choice with 1 point and a 'B' choice with 0 points. (For example, if in question 1 you chose response 'A', you would get 1 point for that question.
2. Now look at every even numbered question, and mark an 'A' choice with 0 points, and a 'B' choice with 1 point. (For example if you chose response 'A' in question 2, you would get no points for that question)
3. Next, look at the subheadings : PmG, PmB, PvG and PvB, and add your individual question scores to get a total for each of these categories. There are five questions for each category. Use the table to help you keep tally.
4. Finally, add up your total 'B' and total 'G' scores.

PmB = PmG =
PvB = PvG =
---------------------- --------------------
Total B = Total G =
---------------------- ---------------------

Interpretation
Your scores mean the following:

If your total 'B' score is
* 3 or below, is optimistic;
* 4 - 6, is average;
* 7 or above, is pessimistic.

If your total 'G' score is
* 8 - 10 is optimistic;
* 6 - 7, is average;
* 5 or below, is pessimistic.

It should be noted that the total 'B' scores are the most significant, as they reflect an individual's 'explanations' about 'Bad' events, while total 'G' scores measure explanations about 'Good' events. Since it is much more difficult to remain positive and optimistic in the face of trials and difficulties, hence an individual's total 'B' score will usually be more important.

Seligman suggests that an optimistic explanatory style, particularly about bad events, encourages perseverance: pessimistic athletes are more likely to lose confidence and motivation after a poor performance than optimists, and encouraging optimism in athletes can therefore lead to improved sports performances by encouraging perseverance.. Likewise the identification of pessimistic athletes in a squad can be important. When a negative event occurs - for example, losing an important match; sustaining an injury; not being selected for a team; and so on - then their explanatory style would promote less perseverance, and may be resulting in those athletes not achieving their inherent sports potential.

It's significant to note that one can't not make explanations about the events that happen in one's life; one has to do that in order to make meaning out of the world. However, the consequences of the type of explanations one makes is very different. If we tend to make more optimistic explanations about events, then we'll be more successful in the long run, than if we tend to make more pessimistic explanations - and this is especially true in sport.

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

References
Cochran, S. D. and Hammen, C. L.
1985 "Perceptions of stressful life events and depression: A test of attributional models."
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 89, 678-682.
Coyne, J. C. and Gotlib, I. H.
1983 "The role of cognition in depression: A critical appraisal." Psychological Bulletin, 94,
472-505.
Cutrona, C. E.
1983 "Causal attributions and perinatal depression." Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 92, 161-172.
Hanrahan, S. and Grove, R.
1990 "A Short Form of the Sport Attributional Style Scale" Australian Journal of Science
& Medicine in Sport Vol 22 Issue 4: 97-101.
Hanrahan, S., Grove, R. and Hattie, J.
1989 "Development of a Questionnaire Measure of Sport-Related Attributional Style" Int. J.
Sport Psychology 20: 114-134.
Jackson, S.
Peterson, C. and Seligman, M. E. P.
1984 "Causal expectations as a risk factor for depression: Theory and evidence." Psychological Review, 91, 347-374.
Seligman, M. E. P.
1990 Learned Optimism Milson's Point, Sydney: Random House Australia.
Tennen, H. and Herzberger, S.
1985 "Attributional Style Questionnaire." Pp20-30 in D. J. Keyser and R. C. Sweetland (eds.), Test Critiques, Vol. 4 Kansas City: Test Corporation of America.

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Coaching the Mind - PART 1: The Next Step for Personal Training

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

INTRODUCTION
Personal trainers are often called on to work with elite sportspeople to provide personalised fitness and strength programs for improving their performance, but with a little more thought and preparation your PT business can offer much more to the elite sportsperson. Specifically, when you recognise that most sportspeople - even at the highest level - are only training half of themselves, it's easy to understand how you can offer a more complete, holistic training service.

Consider the following case studies - what would you do in each of them?

PT Case Study # 1
A young golf professional comes to you for help in designing a fitness program for him. He's motivated and a pleasure to train, and within six months has improved to the point where he has been in contention in major tournaments on a number of occasions ..... however, he consistently folds under the pressure and is now walking and talking like someone who's lost their confidence. What would you do at your next session?

PT Case Study # 2
The mother of an elite tennis player asks you for some assistance with a diet and exercise program for her 15 year old daughter (currently ranked in the top five for her age). After working with her for a month, you discover she suffers from excessive pre-match anxiety - to the point of being physically ill, but she refuses to see a "shrink", and doesn't see it as a problem. What do you do at your next session with her?
PT Case Study # 3
The coach of a footy team that has just scraped into the finals has asked you to provide a training program to get the team fit and ready for their first match. Despite being fit and strong, you hear the players talking negatively about their chances against the more favoured team. What would you do?

Scenarios such as those above are common. Personal trainers, coaches and teachers continually face issues outside of their traditional training. Few would feel competent to handle any of the above situations with confidence, however with a little extra training, there is a lot you can do. In fact, many people see the future of personal training lies in expanding the range of skills and services, and offering your clients a more complete service. A service that isn't just fitness training, or even 'life' coaching, but encompasses much more; a service that incorporates personal performance coaching - coaching the mind and emotions of your clients.

Imagine if you had the skills to help that young golfer overcome his self doubt, and he went on to win the Australian Open or the US Masters? What if you helped the coach of a top footy team prepare his players mentally and emotionally as well as just physically - so they ran out on the field feeling confident and in the peak performance zone. Imagine taking an upcoming young tennis player and sharing their journey from local club competition to satellite events through to a Grand Slam final appearance!

What if you offered some assistance with mental and emotional preparation for your elite athletes, as well as the strength and aerobic fitness work? Athletes are not just bodies are they?

Thoughts and feelings affect sports performances - even more so than physical factors .... yet, how much do you know about training this half of your clients? But then, why would an experienced PT such as yourself bother with the extra training and effort involved in a more complete service to your clients?

Is extra money a good enough incentive? Recognise that elite level sportspeople spend millions of dollars a year worldwide on sports related services in an attempt to gain that competitive edge over their rivals - and this is on the increase. Further, elite level sportspeople - particularly in golf, tennis and football - earn enough to pay handsomely for your services, and are willing to do so on a long term basis. How often have you had clients for a few sessions, then never hear from them again?

How about the prestige associated with working with the best athletes in the world? Does that turn it on for you?

The opportunity is here, now.

There is a huge market of elite level sportspeople needing this more complete personal performance coaching service. I believe it is the next logical step in the evolution of personal training.

Would working with clients who genuinely want to improve do it for you? Have you ever had the experience of 'backsliding' clients? Or clients who 'say' that they want to lose weight, or get fitter, but keep missing appointments, or who lose their motivation? Elite athletes are professional sportspeople - playing sport is their livelihood, their business, so they are more committed and motivated. They are a joy to work with - particularly if you're used to working a lot with 'average' 9 to 5'ers.
So have I excited you about a huge potential new client base, and a new way of working with your old client base yet? Stay with me, because the next question you're going to ask is "How can I do it?"

Which is of course, brings us to the next step - how to understand the unique needs of elite sportspeople, and how to develop your skills in five key areas of this new approach to Personal Training.

How to deal with the Mind Matters of Personal Training. I will be discussing these five key areas and how to apply them in the next article. Stay tuned!

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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Coaching the Mind - PART 2: The Next Step for Personal Training

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

In the last article I introduced - and hopefully excited you about - the potential for personal trainers to increase their income and client base working with elite level sportspeople. I mentioned that these clients have unique needs, and personal trainers wanting to work with elite sportspeople, want to develop skills in five key areas - what I term the Mind Matters of Personal Training.

A WINNING ATTITUDE
The first of these keys is to encourage a winning attitude in your clients. Now someone with a winning attitude is not someone who is merely obsessed with victory, but rather someone who has : a solution oriented focus; asks the right questions of themselves; and has powerful, positive self talk.

A solution oriented focus is all about looking for the answers, rather than focusing on the problems. You can encourage this in what you do with your clients, and how you communicate with them.

Rather than dwelling on 'problems', encourage them to consider solutions - how did they overcome a similar situation previously? What do they need to do to move forward?

Which leads into asking the right questions doesn't it? How often have you heard why(n)ing questions from your clients? Why can't I lose weight? What's wrong with me? Why am I so unfit? Why can't I get motivated?

The trouble with these kinds of questions is that even if you get the answer, you're still not left with a solution! This, of course, is the problem with traditional psychotherapy! Who cares where the 'problem' comes from - what your clients want is to know how to get out of it! So help them out by encouraging them to ask 'How' questions. How can I do such and such, and enjoy the process? How can I stay motivated? What can I do to achieve this step towards my goal? How can I stay on my healthy diet and exercise program?

Of course, this is supported by encouraging powerful, positive self talk in your clients. Of course you can do it! Stick with it! You'll make it! You deserve success. You've got what it takes. Perservere. Persist. All champions do.
POSITIVE MOTIVATION AND HIGH ACHIEVEMENT STRATEGIES
Goal setting is an obvious characteristic of elite sportspeople, and you've no doubt heard about goal setting ad nauseam! So I won't belabour the obvious here, but rather note a couple of things about goals of which you may not be aware.

Firstly, do you understand how and why goals work?

There is a part of the brain known as the RAS (reticular activating system) which, in simple terms, controls what we pay attention to. It does this unconsciously, based on what we have consciously decided is important to us.

For example, I recently decided to purchase a new car, and after a few weeks of looking around had decided on a particular brand and model. In the next few weeks prior to my purchasing the new vehicle, I saw that particular kind of car everywhere - whereas previously I had never even noticed them! I'm sure something similar has happened to you - either when choosing bricks or tiles for a new house, a new piece of business equipment, or whatever.

As soon as we consciously decide some particular thing is important to us, then our RAS filters the environment around us, unconsciously, and triggers our attention to items related to that particular thing. Without clear goals, this process cannot happen, and so the individual without goals doesn't notice the opportunities that someone with goals does automatically.

The other important thing about goals is that for someone to actively work towards a particular goal, they have to have a powerful enough reason. Particularly in elite level sport! Every athlete gets to a point in their training when they ask themselves "Why am I doing this?" If they don't have clear, unambiguous and powerful reasons to answer that question, then they will give up, and do something else.

So you can aid your clients be pre-asking this question, and having them list a number of clear reasons for you. Then, whenever their motivation is flagging, you can say: "Remember X? Remember what you're doing this for!"

Having clear, powerful reasons makes the difference between someone who is 'playing' sport, and a sports professional. Having powerful reasons makes the difference between someone who takes action on their goals and dreams, and someone who remains a dreamer.

BUILDING POSITIVE SELF CONCEPT
Self belief, in my opinion, is the single most essential characterising trait of the champion athlete. However, like motivation, concentration, a positive attitude, and so on, it's a learned behaviour - and one which you can help build in your clients.

Without doubt the biggest influence upon self belief and self confidence is the ability to cope with mistakes, failures, poor performances, and outright rejection in your life. Everyone can believe in themselves when things are going well! It's only when the chips are down and your back is to the wall that your underlying self belief is really tested, and either found wanting, or is strengthened by the adversity.

Obviously, positive self belief is closely linked to, and supported by, positive self talk. However, there is one key area that is often overlooked in building self belief, and that is one's attitude to errors, and there is an excellent strategy that I've developed which I call the ARIA technique which is extremely valuable that you can teach to your clients.

I'll explain this in detail in the next article, together with the other two key areas : Emotional Management and Visualisation Techniques. [If you can't wait then you can refer to the Sportsmind book, pages 33 - 35

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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Coaching the Mind - PART 3: The Next Step for Personal Training

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

BUILDING POSITIVE SELF CONCEPT
Self belief, in my opinion, is the single most essential characterising trait of the champion athlete. However, like motivation, concentration, a positive attitude, and so on, it's a learned behaviour - and one which you can help build in your clients.

Without doubt the biggest influence upon self belief and self confidence is the ability to cope with mistakes, failures, poor performances, and outright rejection in your life. Everyone can believe in themselves when things are going well! It's only when the chips are down and your back is to the wall that your underlying self belief is really tested, and either found wanting, or is strengthened by the adversity.

So teach your clients some strategies for dealing with the 'down' times. One way to do this is to encourage a positive self talk through the use of positive affirmation statements - short, powerful phrases about what you want to be true for you. For example, "I'm motivated and enthusiastic about training now", or "I enjoy feeding my body healthful foods every day", or "It's easy for me to be calm and focused under pressure now", and so on.

Of course, this is supported by your talk to your clients: Of course you can do it! Stick with it! You'll make it! You deserve success. You've got what it takes. Persevere. Persist. All champions do.

EMOTION MANAGEMENT
One of the most important concepts in performance psychology that every athlete wants to know about, and master, is the idea of emotional state. You know, and have experienced many different states : anger; sadness; boredom; jealousy; happiness; determination; excitement; and so on. Yet states don't just 'jump' on you out of the blue, do they? You don't suddenly experience anxiety, rage, or loneliness, for no reason do you?

States are effects - they are a consequence of something you're doing in your mind. How you think affects how you feel. Teach your clients to control their thoughts to take charge of their emotions.
One simple technique I use with my athletes is called the 'present moment' technique., and it's an effective way to help maintain focus and concentration.

The technique is simply to take ten seconds paying attention to some external visual aspects of your surroundings; ten seconds to your breathing; and then ten seconds visualising success from an 'in-body' perspective.

VISUALISATION TECHINQUES
Visualisation is a common skill we all use all the time; to achieve anything, to do anything, we first 'see' ourselves doing it. So visualisation is not something strange or difficult, but something we all constantly use in order to function in the world ..... we all can visualise. The trouble is, many people use visualisation negatively - they imagine all the bad things that could happen, and then hope they don't!

The important thing to realise is that we human beings are a lot like guided missiles - we move in the direction of our regular and consistent thoughts and imaginings; we move toward what we picture in our mind - particularly what we picture with vividness and strong feeling. Whenever we associate a vivid picture with a strong feeling, it has a magnetic attraction.

So you want to encourage your clients to have a positive focus, and you want to encourage them to practice their visualisation skills. There is overwhelming scientific evidence which demonstrates the undeniable fact that regular visualisation can improve sports performances - and it works because visualisation has a measurable, physiological effect on our body. When you visualise doing a movement, play, stroke, shot, or performance, there is a measurable response by the specific muscles used in that activity in response to your imagined movements.

Neurologically, your body can't tell the difference between a 'real' experience, and a vividly imagined one, and this makes it possible to 'program in' desired shots, strokes, plays, movements, behaviours, and even emotional responses prior to doing them. In other words you can 'groove in' to your body at a cellular level, a 'muscle memory' of what you want your body to do.

For more details on any of the above Mind Matters for PT's consult the Sportsmind or Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings books.

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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Sports Optimism: Building a Positive Mental Attitude in Sport

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

Introduction
Cognitive psychologists suggest that an individual athlete's "explanatory style" is a significant factor in influencing sports performance. Individuals with an optimistic explanatory style consistently outperform those with a pessimistic explanatory style. [Seligman, (1990); Hanrahan & Grove (1990)]. Their work is based on 'attribution theory' - ie. on how people explain 'good' and 'bad' events that happen in their lives. An individual's explanatory style can be used to determine their level of optimism or pessimism - and as a consequence, their performance potential in sport.

To determine explanatory style (and hence optimism or pessimism), psychologists typically employ an Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ) to evaluate various "dimensions" such as Personalisation (Ps), Permanence (Pm) and Pervasiveness (Pv) about both negative and positive events which has been suggested ultimately determine optimism or pessimism in explanatory style [Seligman (1990)]. Others, [Hanrahan, Grove and Hattie (1989), Hanrahan and Grove (1990)], have likewise developed attributional style questionnaires measuring dimensions of internality, stability, controllability, globality and intentionality.

Most such questionnaires use very general scenarios and are not particularly sports specific, consequently, the following short questionnaire was developed as a sports contextualised style of ASQ. Using the following short Sports ASQ coaches can obtain a very general guide to their athletes' explanatory style, and establish relative levels of optimism and pessimism between individual players. Such information may be of use in both the recruitment and selection of players (when everything else is about equal choose the more optimistic recruit), and in identifying existing players who may benefit from specific psychological skills training to develop more optimism - and hence improve sports performance.

When using the following questionnaire with players, recognise that it is a simplistic questionnaire - not a proper psychological diagnostic tool - and should be used as a guide only. Should a specific player be identified as pessimistic by this questionnaire, further professional guidance should be sought in establishing the veracity of the result, and in the specific identification and design of a cognitive training program to develop more optimism.

Ideally, rather than a psychological profiling tool, the questionnaire should be viewed and used as a way to encourage players to "think about their thinking" - and to establish a dialogue among players and between players and coaching staff as to the types of thinking which lead to good sports performances.

For those who wish to explore the concepts of optimism and explanatory stye in greater detail, there are validated psychological tools (such as the Seligman Attributional Style Questionnaire) which I recommend and which can be used for specific psychological profiling. For more information about these, contact Sportsmind and I can refer you to appropriate organisations and professionals who have the skills and expertise in this area.

Instructions

Hand out the questionnaire and encourage your players to complete it quickly, choosing the response that most closely reflects how they would think in the given context.


SPORTS OPTIMISM QUESTIONNAIRE

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
There are no 'right' or 'wrong' answers. Circle only one response per question, and answer every question even though the situation may never have happened to you. Read each description and imagine it happening to you; then choose the response that is most closest to how you would think in that situation.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PmG
1. Situation: You are asked to replace a player in a higher grade who is injured :
A: I am good enough to play in the higher grade.
B: I have filled in occasionally before when needed.

2. Situation: You win a tournament / important game :
A: I was feeling unbeatable that day.
B: I always put a lot of effort into my training.

3. Situation: You do exceptionally well in an interview for a coaching position :
A: I always perform well in interviews.
B: I felt very relaxed and confident in the interview.

4. Situation: Despite being new to the team, you are put in the starting lineup :
A: I was in top form that day.
B: I am enthusiastic and try hard.

5. Situation: You invite a few team mates over for a party, and it's a raging success :
A: I host great parties.
B: I was particularly friendly that night.

PmB
6. Situation: You forget to go to training after a long weekend :
A: My mind was still on holiday that day.
B: I always forget when my routine is disrupted.

7. Situation: You lose your cool with the referee during a game :
A: That referee is biased against me.
B: He / She didn't referee fairly in the game.
8. Situation: You put on a lot of weight over Christmas and have trouble getting back
to your peak weight and fitness :
A: The diet I tried didn't work.
B: It's always hard to get back into training after a break.

9. Situation: Your coach says something that hurts your feelings :
A: He / She is always very cutting with criticism.
B: He / She was in a grumpy mood and took it out on me.

10. Situation: You've been feeling very tired lately :
A: I've been really busy this week.
B: I don't get a chance to relax.

PvG
11. Situation: You successfully resuscitate a person who was pulled from the surf :
A: I stay calm in a crisis.
B: I'm trained in first aid.

12. Situation: Your team is losing, and the coach asks your advice :
A: I know some good plays for pressure situations.
B: I always keep an overall perspective on the game.

13. Situation: You win a 'most improved player' award :
A: I was the most improved player.
B: I had important wins near the end of the season.

14. Situation: Your coach tells you you are at peak fitness level :
A: I stuck to my training program.
B: I'm very fitness conscious.

15. Situation: A team member comments on your confidence :
A: I am a confident person.
B: I've been playing well lately.

PvB
16. Situation: You perform poorly at an event for which you've been training hard :
A: The competition was fierce that day.
B: I'm not a natural athlete.
17. Situation: The coach says you're not working hard enough :
A: I'm not as motivated as everyone else in the team.
B: I have been slacking off a bit lately.

18. Situation: Your romantic partner breaks it off with you :
A: I didn't communicate well with him / her.
B: I'm too moody.

19. Situation: You are in charge of a team training session while your coach is sick, and
no one enjoys the training :
A: I'm not very good at coaching.
B: I didn't put much thought into the coaching session.

20. Situation: You forget to go to an unscheduled training session.
A: I forgot to check my diary that day.
B: I've got a bad memory for things like that.

Marking
Evaluate your answers using the following system:

1. Start by looking at every odd numbered question, and mark an 'A' choice with 1 point and a 'B' choice with 0 points. (For example, if in question 1 you chose response 'A', you would get 1 point for that question.
2. Now look at every even numbered question, and mark an 'A' choice with 0 points, and a 'B' choice with 1 point. (For example if you chose response 'A' in question 2, you would get no points for that question)
3. Next, look at the subheadings : PmG, PmB, PvG and PvB, and add your individual question scores to get a total for each of these categories. There are five questions for each category. Use the table to help you keep tally.
4. Finally, add up your total 'B' and total 'G' scores.

PmB = PmG =
PvB = PvG =
---------------------- --------------------
Total B = Total G =
---------------------- ---------------------

Interpretation
Your scores mean the following:

If your total 'B' score is
* 3 or below, is optimistic;
* 4 - 6, is average;
* 7 or above, is pessimistic.

If your total 'G' score is
* 8 - 10 is optimistic;
* 6 - 7, is average;
* 5 or below, is pessimistic.

It should be noted that the total 'B' scores are the most significant, as they reflect an individual's 'explanations' about 'Bad' events, while total 'G' scores measure explanations about 'Good' events. Since it is much more difficult to remain positive and optimistic in the face of trials and difficulties, hence an individual's total 'B' score will usually be more important.

Researchers suggest that an optimistic explanatory style, particularly about bad events, encourages perseverance: pessimistic athletes are more likely to lose confidence and motivation after a poor performance than optimists, and encouraging optimism in athletes can therefore lead to improved sports performances by encouraging perseverance. [Seligman (1990)] Likewise the identification of pessimistic athletes in a squad can be important. When a negative event occurs - for example, losing an important match; sustaining an injury; not being selected for a team; and so on - then their explanatory style would promote less perseverance, and may be resulting in those athletes not achieving their inherent sports potential.

It's significant to note that one can't not make explanations about the events that happen in one's life; one has to do that in order to make meaning out of the world. However, the consequences of the type of explanations one makes is very different. If we tend to make more optimistic explanations about events, then we'll be more successful in the long run, than if we tend to make more pessimistic explanations - and this is especially true in sport.

References

Seligman, M.E.P. 1990 Learned Optimism Milson's Pt, Sydney, Random House.

Hanrahan, S & Grove, R 1990 "A Short Form of the Sport Attributional Style Scale" Aust Journal of Science & Medicine in Sport Vol 22 Isue 4 97-101.

Hanrahan, S. & Grove, R, & Hattie, J 1989. "Development of a Questionnaire Measure of Sport-Related Attributional Style" Int Journal of Sport Psychology 20 : 114-134.

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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Goal Achievement: How to Write & Achieve Your Sports Goals

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

CHUNKING DOWN YOUR DREAMS
There are thousands of people with 'dreams' - but only a handful ever make them into reality. How do they do it? Simply, by just:

  1. Committing to their dream - by deciding to do it
  2. Regularly and consistently imagining achieving it
  3. Turning the dream into specific, focused goals
  4. Establishing a step-wise action plan to make it happen.

In the last issue, I spoke about the importance of making a committed decision about your goals, because the only thing that will keep you going when the going gets tough - that will get you up early and working late at night - is a dream, focused into a set of specific goals and action plans. The only thing that will keep you fighting to win when it's five games to one and match point against you, and it's hot and you're tired, is a dream. The only thing that will keep you out there in the cold and rain at training, when you're soaking wet and uncomfortable, is a dream. The only thing that will get you up and pushing forward to make another tackle in the last minutes of the game when you're body is bruised and tired, is a dream. Nothing else will.

WHY DON'T PEOPLE SET GOALS?
Recently, I was invited to give a Sportsmind presentation to a group of aspiring young athletes who had just been selected as the best in their sport in their region, and were being inducted into an elite sports training academy. One of the first questions I asked them was how many of them had written down goals. The answer ..... five out of sixty! And these kids were supposedly the great sporting hopes for the region!

I then asked the question: "Well, why don't people set goals?" They answered with the four most common reasons:

  1. The 'couldn't be bothered' response; the deadly apathetic malaise.
  2. The 'don't want to appear different from peers' response - a typically Australian disease.
  3. The fear of failure - if I don't set a goal, then I can't fail at getting it.
  4. The fear of success - how responsible/guilty/afraid I'd feel if I was incredibly successful.

I wonder if I asked you to show me your written down goals for the next six months, twelve months, and three to five years ...... would you have anything to show me? If not, why not? Are any of the responses above applicable to you in your sport, career, and life?

POWER OF GOALS
You know, a lot of athletes train very hard in the belief that it's hard training that leads inevitably to success. They read about how their idols train; they copy their gym routines and dietary habits; they do everything physically that they do, believing that if they train hard and do all the things that the top performers do - then they'll also succeed.
But it doesn't work that way! The breaks go to the people with dreams and specific goals. You want to have a dream, a goal. Somehow, the dream itself provides the motivation and the means for its own accomplishment.

Every serious sportsperson today knows of the importance of setting goals. However, achieving significant goals in sport, particularly at an elite level, involves more than just the process of setting them. Achieving big goals is a personal management process involving setting a goal, breaking it down into smaller sub-goals, determining a viable action plan, implementing this plan, evaluating progress, adjusting the plan, celebrating achievement, and finally choosing a new goal.

There is power in knowing what you want, and in committing yourself to achieve it, and this is especially true in sport. Champions in every area of life are consistent goal setters and planners. Realise that in six months, you're going to become some one. In a year, you'll be doing some thing. In five years, you're going to be playing at some standard in your sport. In ten years, you're going to be earning some level of income. Why leave these things to chance, or to the whims of the environment, or someone else's plans? Why not decide - right now - who you're going to be, what you're going to be doing, and what you're going to have - in twelve months, five years, and ten years from now?

OUTCOME AND PROCESS GOALS
There are two types of goals that you want to be aware of : outcome goals, and process goals. Outcome goals are the end result: winning a match; hitting a bogey free golf round; running under a specific time; being selected for the national team; etc. Process goals are the specific actions, behaviours, moods, and mental processes required to achieve the desired outcome. In recent years, many people have suggested that it is wrong to set and think abut outcome goals; that we ought focus upon and set just process goals.

However both goals are important to success, because without a clearly defined and desired outcome, motivation flags and there can be a loss of direction. What is important is knowing when to focus on outcome and when to focus on process. For instance, consider a journey. At the beginning of the journey you think of your destination - where you want to end up. Then you get in the car and pay attention to the traffic around you; stop at lights and intersections; change gears; accelerate; turn corners; refuel when necessary; and deal with delays and flat tyres along the way. Now just imagine if you didn't have that destination in mind at the start - what would happen? You'd just hop in the car and start driving, and you might drive extremely well, but you'd end up going nowhere in particular.

Focusing on process goals alone is like that. You want to have a desired outcome and not be afraid of setting it, and going for it. However you also want to have a means by which you're going to get your outcome - and these are your process goals.

Generally, the time to think about outcome goals is prior to and after a performance; the time to focus on process goals is during a performance. For instance, on your journey you'll have an accident if you think too much about the hot date you're doing to visit, but if you don't want that hot date in the first place, you'll probably never get the car out of the garage!

SETTING GOALS
There are FOUR areas in which you will want to set goals for yourself :

  1. SPORTS TECHNIQUES (Eg. Ball skills; Stroke; Swing; the skills of your sport)
  2. PHYSICAL FITNESS (Eg. Strength; Speed; Endurance; Agility; Power; Flexibility; etc)
  3. MENTAL & EMOTIONAL FITNESS (Eg. Concentration; Positive Attitude; Confidence; Self Control; Motivation; etc.)
  4. RELATIONSHIPS (Coach; Teammates; Game Officials; Opposition; Friends; Self)

First identify your current abilities, then list the areas you want to improve:
My strengths are: ................................................................................................
Areas I want to improve are: .............................................................................

Now ask yourself :
# How/where do I want to be in six months from now?
# How/where do I want to be in twelve months from now?
# How/where do I want to be in three to five years from now?

Now on a sheet of paper, write down your three most important 6 month, 12 month, 3-5 years, and long term outcome goals. Set goals in all areas of your life, as well as for your sport: career goals; financial goals; study goals; etc. Take fifteen minutes to do this now. As you do this now, remember is that most people over-estimate what they can practically achieve in a year, yet greatly under-estimate what they can achieve in ten years, or over their lifetime.

Also, you want to set yourself goals that are almost out of reach; goals that require great physical, emotional and mental efforts to achieve. Remember that if you aim for mediocre goals, that's likely what you'll achieve. If you aim for greatness, you may well reach it. But you'll never know your true potential and untapped talents until you really test yourself.

REASONS AND ACTION PLANS
Now write a paragraph on why you want to achieve each of these goals; what are the reasons for wanting them? How would you feel if you didn't achieve them - what would you miss out on? And how are you going to feel when you do achieve each one? Having powerful reasons to achieve your goals can make all the difference. Finally, note the action steps, or process goals, you're going to do today, tomorrow, next week, next month, etc. to achieve them. 

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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SMARTER Goals: How to Make Your Goals Achievable

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

S.M.A.R.T.E.R. GOALS
I think it's important to note that just writing down your goals is not enough, because some people will have a dream, chunk it down into specific goals, and even write them down - and yet still not achieve them. The reason this happens is that they didn't know how to set, and work with, their goals properly. For your goals to be effective they will want to adhere to the following seven S.M.A.R.T.E.R. goal achieving principles. If your goals adhere to these simple principles, you will definitely achieve them. If they don't, chances are you won't get there.

S = Specific and measurable
M = 'Me' focused - controllable by myself
A = Achievable
R = Reviewed regularly
T = Timed
E = Ecological - consider 'whole' self
R = Reasons and Reward

Some people don't set goals at all; others set them, but don't write them down; still others write them down, but don't know how to work with them effectively. These S.M.A.R.T.E.R. goal setting principles provide an easy and practical method of defining precisely what you want, a checking system to make sure your goals are achievable and in line with your current beliefs and values, and a mechanism for ensuring you follow through with them. As we go through them one at a time, check the goals you've written to ensure they meet the criteria - if they don't, then alter them so they do.

S = Specific and measurable
Ensure your goals are specific and measurable. What precisely do you want? Rather than writing "I want to get better at tennis", or "I want to lose weight", or "I want to play well in the game this weekend", identify the specific level you want to attain. Some examples might be: "To be a trim and toned 75kg"; "To reduce my golf handicap by 3 strokes"; "To achieve 70% of my first services in court"; "To earn $80,000 this financial year".

M = 'Me' focused - controllable by myself
Your goals want to be controllable by yourself. Goals such as "I want to marry X", or "I want my son to be a concert pianist", or even "I'm going to win the golf tournament", are not under your control. X might not want to marry you, your son may not want to become a concert pianist, and winning is a result of how well you, and your opponents, play, on the day.

More controllable goals would be: "I'm going to ask X out on a date" (you can control your asking - not their going); or "I'm going to provide my son with the opportunities and encouragement to become a concert pianist"; or "I'm going to hit 79 or better today", (which if everyone else plays about to their handicap, will see me win the tournament).
It's important to recognise that you can't control winning - but you can control your level of effort, your enthusiasm, your concentration, and your attitude. So some people suggest that rather than focusing on the outcome, (winning), you direct all your attention to the process, (the means by which you will win). While I agree on the importance of paying attention to the process, I do think it's also important to still want to win, and to aim to win. I think both are equally important, because athletes, managers, or salespeople who just focus on the 'process' alone in their goal setting, lose the necessary hunger, the edge that makes a champion performer. This edge comes from the desire to win. So you want to win, yet you also want to focus on the means by which you will win - the skills and techniques that you employ to hit straight down the fairway, or make a sale, or resolve a conflict, or coach a team, or whatever.

A = Achievable
A is for achievable. Make your goals achievable from where you are now. For instance, if you're currently playing B grade tennis, it's not very realistic to set a goal to win the U.S. Open this year - you'd just be setting yourself up for a failure. However, if you're a hot young teenage tennis player with a lot of motivation and the desire to reach the top, then setting such a goal for say six or seven years time, might very well be achievable - provided you're willing to put in the effort. Assess your current abilities and set a goal enough beyond yourself to challenge you and make you want to work toward it, but not something way beyond your current ability, or too easy, or you'll just get discouraged, or bored. As a general rule if you can't 'see' yourself achieving a goal, then you probably won't, so aim for something a bit smaller, then when you reach that, shoot for the bigger one.

R = Reviewed regularly
It's important to remember to regularly review your goals. Build a positive expectation of success by regularly thinking about your goals, and imagining what it will be like to achieve them. Whatever it is that you're aiming for, write it on a sheet of paper - make up a colourful poster, and even include photos and drawings if you want - and put it on the ceiling above your bed, or on the back of the toilet door, or on the fridge door, or on your briefcase, or in your wallet, or in all these places. The more you start thinking of yourself as already having the goal, or already the way you want to be, the faster you will make it happen.

Look at your list of written goals at least once every day. Preferably, spend five minutes first thing in the morning, and last thing at night to briefly think about them. This both sets the tone for your whole day by giving you a strong sense of direction right from the moment you wake up, and allows your unconscious resources to provide you with inspiration and ideas as you sleep. I also recommend writing your goals on small palm cards, (about the size of a business card), and carrying them with you throughout the day. Then if you get stuck in traffic, or in a queue at the bank, rather than feeling angry and frustrated, you can use the time productively to think about and imagine achieving them! There are no 'idle' thoughts - every thought plants the seed of a step on the way to achieving what you want in your life. Cultivate a constructive obsession for your goals; think about them; dream about them; want them.

T = Timed
T stands for setting a specific time or target date by which you will achieve the goal. If you don't do this it's too easy to just keep putting it off to 'one day'. Goals have been called 'dreams with a deadline', so set a timeline for your achieving each of your goals. Some examples of specific, timed goals might be: "To swim an Olympic qualifying time in the 100m freestyle at the national titles next month"; "To buy a new house by the end of the year"; "To attain my brown belt by the end of the year"; or "To win a major golf tournament within five years".

E = Ecological - consider your 'whole' self
Personal ecology is a concept that recognises that you are a complex organism, made up of different 'parts'. If these parts of yourself get into conflict, then you're not going to function optimally. Ecology means being responsible to your whole self, when you set and work toward your goals. This means consider the other things that are important in your life, or that you have responsibility for. For example, relationships, work, family, study, and relaxation. Denying a part of yourself to achieve a goal will only lead to self sabotage, as the part of you that is denied manifests periods of lethargy or unmotivation; excessive nervousness in important competitions; lapses in concentration at crucial moments, or recurrent injuries.

This is one reason why some people don't achieve a particular goal - there is a part of them that doesn't really want it to happen, and so it sabotages their performance. For instance, you might set yourself a goal to represent your country in your sport, then as you put more and more time into training, and are away from home more and more frequently, that part of you that needs and values the emotional support of a relationship feels denied, and 'out of the blue' you suddenly get sick, or injure yourself, just before an important selection trial, and miss out on selection. Or after playing really well all season, you have a form slump and put in a pathetic performance - just when the selectors are watching! This type of thing happens so often in sport, it's no accident! It's a result of pushing yourself, rather than working with yourself in achieving goals. This is why it's so important when setting your goals to really listen to yourself - to pay attention to your feelings.

E also stands for empower yourself by giving yourself permission to achieve your goals, and know that you're worthy of them. Sometimes, on the verge of success, people sabotage their performance because their self concept is not large enough to accept success. Enlarge your self concept by continually affirming to yourself that you are worthy of success and high achievement - you are worthy of being called a champion in your chosen sport, or career.

R = Reasons and Reward
The final key in the SMARTER process of goal achieving is to have powerful reasons for achieving a goal, and to reward yourself when you achieve a goal, or a significant milestone along the way to a goal. It's a very useful exercise to consider why you want to achieve a particular goal - what are your personal reasons underlying your desire for it? Having powerful reasons for achieving a goal can make a world of difference in your ability to achieve it - especially when the going gets tough.

At the Aikido Dojo that I attend there is a quietly spoken, petite woman who is about fifty years old. This woman is also a second Dan black belt, and is an incredible inspiration for us all, because she took up Aikido in her forties, and maintained the discipline, courage and determination through injuries and setbacks, to attain not only a black belt, but her second Dan black belt - which could be likened to the difference between a Bachelor's degree and a Masters! When asked why she took up Aikido, and why she maintains her training, her reply was simple, yet very powerful: "I wanted to feel dangerous", she said! Here we have a small, middle aged woman who at first glance would be a pushover to even a teenage mugger - yet who in reality is a very dangerous woman indeed!

Finally, do reward yourself when you achieve a goal, or a significant milestone along the way to a goal. Even for small goals, give yourself a reward. If you give up cigarettes for a month, or even a week - be proud of the accomplishment. If you eat healthily, and limit your alcohol intake, then tell yourself you've done well today. See how many DFDs (Drug Free Days) you can put together in a row. Recognise that things like alcohol, coffee, cigarettes, and other so called 'recreational' drugs dull your senses, and blunt the keen edge needed to perform at your best. They're for losers. Champions may not all be teetotallers, but I've rarely seen one that smokes, drinks to excess, or is addicted to coffee or marijuana. They also eat healthy food - recognising that their body is a superbly tuned engine, and their health is their greatest asset.

Do something special, just for yourself, when you achieve a major goal; celebrate your successes, because this will build the motivation and confidence to go for the next goal, and the next. The more you set up a positive feedback loop, the more your system will want to continue to set goals, and achieve them. If you don't reward yourself, you won't build the positive goal setting habits that are a part of every champion's behaviour.

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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Thinking SMARTEST

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

Introduction

Ever noticed how some things seem to get repeated over and over, said again and again by different motivational speakers, without being improved on? I've lost count of the number of times I've heard or read the SMART principles in goal setting (your goals want to be Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Timed) - yet to those who understand the NLP concept of a well formed outcome, the SMART principles aren't that smart at all, and are missing a lot of key information.

Hence I've developed the SMARTEST principles, which I hope after numerous repetitions (by people who simply copy others and don't actually think for themselves), will eventually be replaced by the EVEN SMARTER principles!

Being SMARTEST
For your goals to be effective they will want to adhere to the following eight S.M.A.R.T.E.S.T. goal achieving principles. If your goals adhere to these simple principles, you will definitely achieve them. If they don't, chances are you won't get there. I've found these seven principles particularly important when working with athletes

S = Specific and measurable
M = 'Me' focused - controllable by myself
A = Achievable
R = Reasons
T = Timed
E = Ecological - consider 'whole' self
S = Strategy or action plan
T = Thought about regularly

Some people don't set goals at all; others set them, but don't write them down; still others write them down, but don't know how to work with them effectively. These S.M.A.R.T.E.S.T. goal setting principles provide an easy and practical method of defining precisely what you want, a checking system to make sure your goals are achievable and in line with your current beliefs and values, and a mechanism for ensuring you follow through with them. I suggest you first identify a couple of goals you'd like to achieve for yourself, then as we go through the S.M.A.R.T.E.S.T. principles one at a time, check the goals you've written to ensure they meet the criteria - if they don't, then alter them so they do.

S = Specific and measurable
Ensure your goals are specific and measurable. What precisely do you want? Rather than writing "I want to get better at tennis", or "I want to lose weight", or "I want to play well in the game this weekend", identify the specific level you want to attain. Some examples might be: "To be a trim and toned 75kg"; "To reduce my golf handicap by 3 strokes"; "To achieve 70% of my first services in court"; "To earn $80,000 this financial year".

M = 'Me' focused - controllable by myself
Your goals want to be controllable by yourself. Goals such as "I want to marry Demi Moore", or "I want my son to be a concert pianist", or even "I'm going to win the golf tournament", are not under your control. Demi might not want to marry you, your son may not want to become a concert pianist, and winning is a result of how well you, and your opponents, play, on the day.

More controllable goals would be: "I'm going to ask Demi Moore out on a date" (you can control your asking - not her going); or "I'm going to provide my son with the opportunities and encouragement to become a concert pianist"; or "I'm going to hit 79 or better today", (which if everyone else plays about to their handicap, will see me win the tournament).

It's important to recognise that you can't control winning - but you can control your level of effort, your enthusiasm, your concentration, and your attitude. So some people suggest that rather than focusing on the outcome, (winning), you direct all your attention to the process, (the means by which you will win). While I agree on the importance of paying attention to the process, I do think it's also important to still want to win, and to aim to win. I think both are equally important, because athletes, managers, or salespeople who just focus on the 'process' alone in their goal setting, lose the necessary hunger, the edge that makes a champion performer. This edge comes from the desire to win. So you want to win, yet you also want to focus on the means by which you will win - the skills and techniques that you employ to hit straight down the fairway, or make a sale, or resolve a conflict, or coach a team, or whatever.

A = Achievable
A is for achievable. Make your goals achievable from where you are now. For instance, if you're currently playing B grade tennis, it's not very realistic to set a goal to win the U.S. Open this year - you'd just be setting yourself up for a failure. However, if you're a hot young teenage tennis player with a lot of motivation and the desire to reach the top, then setting such a goal for say six or seven years time, might very well be achievable - provided you're willing to put in the effort. Assess your current abilities and set a goal enough beyond yourself to challenge you and make you want to work toward it, but not something way beyond your current ability, or too easy, or you'll just get discouraged, or bored. As a general rule if you can't 'see' yourself achieving a goal, then you probably won't, so aim for something a bit smaller, then when you reach that, shoot for the bigger one.

R = Reasons
The most important key in the SMARTER process of goal achieving is to have powerful reasons for achieving a goal. It's a very useful exercise to consider why you want to achieve a particular goal - what are your personal reasons underlying your desire for it? Having powerful reasons for achieving a goal can make a world of difference in your ability to achieve it - especially when the going gets tough.

At the Aikido Dojo that I attend there is a quietly spoken, petite woman who is about fifty years old. This woman is also a second Dan black belt, and is an incredible inspiration for us all, because she took up Aikido in her forties, and maintained the discipline, courage and determination through injuries and setbacks, to attain not only a black belt, but her second Dan black belt - which could be likened to the difference between a Bachelor's degree and a PhD! When asked why she took up Aikido, and why she maintains her training, her reply was simple, yet very powerful: "I wanted to feel dangerous", she said! Here we have a small, middle aged woman who at first glance would be a pushover to even a teenage mugger - yet who in reality is a very dangerous woman indeed!

When working with my clients I ask them to list at least five powerfully compelling reasons why they want to achieve a particular goal, and this provides personal leverage for themselves for those times when their motivation wanes, and they start to question "Why am I doing this?" They already have an answer for themselves!

T = Timed
T stands for setting a specific time or target date by which you will achieve the goal. If you don't do this it's too easy to just keep putting it off to 'one day'. Goals have been called 'dreams with a deadline', so set a timeline for your achieving each of your goals. Some examples of specific, timed goals might be: "To swim an Olympic qualifying time in the 100m freestyle at the national titles next month"; "To buy a new house by the end of the year"; "To attain my brown belt by the end of the year"; or "To reduce my golf handicap to 5 within the next two years".

E = Ecological - consider your 'whole' self
Personal ecology is a concept that recognises that you are a complex organism, made up of different 'parts'. If these parts of yourself get into conflict, then you're not going to function optimally. Ecology means being responsible to your whole self, when you set and work toward your goals.

This means considering the other things that are important in your life, or that you have responsibility for. For example, relationships, work, family, study, and relaxation. Denying a part of yourself to achieve a goal will only lead to self sabotage, as the part of you that is denied manifests periods of lethargy or unmotivation; excessive nervousness in important competitions; lapses in concentration at crucial moments, or recurrent injuries.

This is one reason why some people don't achieve a particular goal - there is a part of them that doesn't really want it to happen, and so it sabotages their performance. For instance, you might set yourself a goal to represent your country in your sport, then as you put more and more time into training, and are away from home more and more frequently, that part of you that needs and values the emotional support of a relationship feels denied, and 'out of the blue' you suddenly get sick, or injure yourself, just before an important selection trial, and miss out on selection. Or after playing really well all season, you have a form slump and put in a pathetic performance - just when the selectors are watching!

This type of thing happens so often in sport, it's no accident! It's a result of pushing yourself, rather than working with yourself in achieving goals. This is why it's so important when setting your goals to really listen to yourself - to pay attention to your various parts.

E also stands for empower yourself by giving yourself permission to achieve your goals, and know that you're worthy of them. Sometimes, on the verge of success, people sabotage their performance because their self concept is not large enough to accept success. Enlarge your self concept by continually affirming to yourself that you are worthy of success and high achievement - you are worthy of being called a champion in your chosen sport, or career.

S = Strategy or action plan
Obviously just wanting something is not going to make it happen - you will need a strategy, a viable action plan, and be willing to be flexible in adapting to setbacks and obstacles along the way.

It's useful to ask : What can I do today, tomorrow, this week, next month, this year to advance my goal? How can I achieve it? What resources and assistance do I need? Obviously with major goals you will want to chunk them down to simple steps. So what are you waiting for?

T = Thought about regularly
Remember to regularly review your goals. Build a positive expectation of success by regularly thinking about your goals, and imagining what it will be like to achieve them.

Whatever it is that you're aiming for, write it on a sheet of paper - make up a colourful poster, and even include photos and drawings if you want - and put it on the ceiling above your bed, or on the back of the toilet door, or on the fridge door, or on your briefcase, or in your wallet, or in all these places. The more you start thinking of yourself as already having the goal, or already being the way you want to be, the faster you will make it happen.

Look at your list of written goals at least once every day. Preferably, spend five minutes first thing in the morning, and last thing at night to briefly think about and imagine achieving them. This both sets the tone for your whole day by giving you a strong sense of direction right from the moment you wake up, and allows your unconscious resources to provide you with inspiration and ideas as you sleep.

I also recommend writing your goals on small palm cards, (about the size of a business card), and carrying them with you throughout the day. Then if you get stuck in traffic, or in a queue at the bank, rather than feeling angry and frustrated, you can use the time productively to think about and imagine achieving them!

There are no 'idle' thoughts - every thought plants the seed of a step on the way to achieving what you want in your life. Cultivate a constructive obsession for your goals; think about them; dream about them; want them.

Finally, do reward yourself when you achieve a goal, or a significant milestone along the way to a goal. Even for small goals, give yourself a reward. If you give up cigarettes for a month, or even a week - be proud of the accomplishment. If you eat healthily, and limit your alcohol intake, then tell yourself you've done well today.

See how many DFDs (Drug Free Days) you can put together in a row. Recognise that things like alcohol, coffee, cigarettes, and other so called 'recreational' drugs dull your senses, and blunt the keen edge needed to perform at your best. They're for losers.

Champions may not all be teetotallers, but I've rarely seen one that smokes, drinks to excess, or is addicted to coffee or marijuana. They also eat healthy food - recognising that their body is a superbly tuned engine, and their health is their greatest asset.

Do something special, just for yourself, when you achieve a major goal; celebrate your successes, because this will build the motivation and confidence to go for the next goal, and the next. The more you set up a positive feedback loop, the more your body-mind system will want to continue to set goals, and achieve them. If you don't reward yourself, you won't build the positive goal setting habits that are a part of every champion's behaviour.

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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Practical Suggestions for Achieving Your Dream

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

The key to being successful in your sport may not be as a result of a different diet, or through a new cross training regimen, or with the latest technologically advanced running shoes - it could be something as simple as how you set your goals. Some people don't set goals at all; others set them, but don't write them down; still others write them down, but don't know how to work with them effectively. The following S.M.A.R.T.E.R. goal setting principles will provide you with an easy and practical method of defining precisely what you want - which is the first step in getting there!

WHY DON'T PEOPLE SET GOALS?
Recently, I was invited to give a Sportsmind presentation to a group of aspiring young athletes who had just been selected as the best in their sport in their region, and were being inducted into an elite sports training academy. One of the first questions I asked them was how many of them had written down goals. The answer ..... five out of sixty! And these kids were supposedly the great sporting hopes for the region!

I then asked the question: "Well, why don't people set goals?" They answered with the four most common reasons:
1. The 'couldn't be bothered' response; the deadly apathetic malaise.
2. The 'don't want to appear different from peers' response - a typically Australian disease.
3. The fear of failure - if I don't set a goal, then I can't fail at getting it.
4. The fear of success - how responsible/guilty/afraid I'd feel if I was incredibly successful.

I wonder if I asked you to show me your written down goals for the next six months, twelve months, and three to five years ...... would you have anything to show me? If not, why not? Are any of the responses above applicable to you in your sport?

IMPORTANCE OF A DREAM
You know, a lot of athletes train very hard in the belief that it's hard training that leads inevitably to success. They read about (in ULTRAFIT of course!) how their idols train; they copy their gym routines and dietary habits; they do everything physically that they do, believing that if they train hard and do all the things that the top performers do - then they'll also succeed. But let me tell you it doesn't work that way. The breaks go to the people with dreams and specific goals. You want to have a dream, a goal. Somehow, the dream itself provides the motivation and the means for its own accomplishment.

The only thing that will keep you going when the going gets tough, is a dream focused into a set of specific goals. Nothing else will. The only thing that will keep you fighting to win when it's five games to one and match point against you, and it's hot and you're tired, is a dream. The only thing that will keep you out there in the cold and rain at training, when you're soaking wet and uncomfortable, is a dream. The only thing that will get you up and pushing forward to make another tackle in the last minutes of the game when you're body is aching and exhausted, is a dream.

BRINGING DREAMS TO REALITY
Having dreams is important - but lots of people have 'dreams', yet they never achieve them. How do you turn dreams into reality?

One of the keys is to understand how you got to be where you are, right now, because where you are now was at one time just a dream, wasn't it? There was a time when, for instance, you hadn't even started playing or competing in your chosen sport - and to reach the level you're at now was just a dream. Isn't it so?
So what was it that brought that dream to reality? What is it that precedes all our actions, all our behaviours, all our performances in every area of our lives? It's our decisions, isn't it?

Your decisions precede all your actions, and therefore determine who you become. Everything in your life, including your current level of performance in your sport is determined by the decisions you have made, and are making right now. The decisions you're making right now, even as you read this article, are determining what you think, how you feel, what you do, and who you become.

If you ask yourself why a particular person is currently performing better than you, then the answer is simply that they've made some different decisions. Different decisions about how they spend their time; different decisions about how they respond to setbacks or defeats; different decisions about their approach to training - but most importantly, different decisions about what they expect of themselves, and what they want to achieve in their sport.

TRUE DECISIONS
The power of a committed decision to help you improve your current performance cannot be underestimated. However, for your decisions to make a real difference in your life and in your performance, it's important that they be true decisions. Too many people don't understand what a true decision is - they use the word loosely, and so decisions for them have become just preferences.

A true decision leaves no choice for any other option. If you truly decide to give up smoking, then that's it, you no longer even consider the possibility of smoking again. If you truly decide to reduce your golf handicap by five strokes over the next twelve months, then you'll do it. If you truly decide to improve your fitness, or lose weight, or reach a higher standard in your sport, then you'll do it.

However, many people just state preferences. I think I'd like to give up cigarettes; or I'd like to improve my percentage of first services in; or I hope to make the first eleven. These are just 'wish lists' - and serious sportspeople have no time for wish lists.

So how do you tell when you've made a 'true' decision? Action always follows true decisions! For instance, if you truly decide to buy a new car, then you'll go to see a dealer, or you'll phone up to put an add in the paper to sell your old one. If you truly decide to end a relationship, then you'll confront you're partner, or you'll pack you're bags. Likewise, if you make a true decision to reach a higher standard in your sport, then you'll take some action.

S.M.A.R.T.E.R GOALS AND ACTION PLANS
There is power in knowing what you want, and in committing yourself to achieve it, and this is especially true in sport. All the top sports men and women are consistent goal setters and planners. Consider this: In six months time, in twelve months time, in five years, in ten years you're going to become some one; you're going to be performing at some standard in your sport. Why leave it to chance? Why not choose, today, who and what you want to be in six months, in twelve months, in five years and in ten years time?

So here's a little exercise for you to do. Write down, right now, the three most important things you want to achieve for yourself in the next six months, twelve months and three to five years.

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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Hypnosis & Sport

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

Introduction
If you've ever watched a stage hypnotist have someone act like a chicken, or stand on their head, or do some other equally stupid or frivolous behaviour, you may have wondered whether hypnosis could be used in more useful and constructive ways.

You may perhaps have heard of hypnosis being used to stop smoking, lose weight or change some other unwanted behaviour, but could it be used to do better what you already do well? Can hypnosis, for instance, assist sportspeople to improve their performances?

The answer is a resounding 'YES!'

Through the use of SPORTS HYPNOSIS techniques, not only can an athlete successfully change an unwanted behaviour or habit, but limiting perceptions and beliefs can be released; pain controlled and injuries healed more rapidly; self confidence increased; and sports performances significantly improved.

What is Hypnosis?
There are many myths, misunderstandings and half truths about hypnosis - due no doubt to the fact that very little is understood about how or why hypnosis works, and even among experienced hypnotists there is significant disagreement about hypnosis.

So exactly what is hypnosis, and how can it improve my game?

One way to talk about hypnosis is to say that it is a process in which a person induces in themselves a state of mind, (often called a 'trance'), in which their perceptions are significantly altered from those normally experienced in the usual waking state, and in which they have access to a greater range of personal resources and abilities. The resources and abilities of their unconscious mind.

It's important to realise that while some students of hypnosis disagree, many hypnotists understand that it is impossible to have someone follow a suggestion that the person doesn't want to follow. The role of the hypnotist then is not to 'put someone into a trance', but rather the hypnotist helps to create an environment in which the person themselves changes their ordinary 'conscious' perceptions and accesses more 'unconscious' perceptions and resources - and so changes themselves.

No-one can hypnotise you - but you can choose to hypnotise yourself! In fact, this is essentially what you are doing every minute of the day - self hypnosis! When you say to yourself, "I've got a weak backhand"; or "I always slice"; or "I never play bunkers well"; or "We never play well at that venue", then you're just hypnotising yourself to making it come true! Many of the currently accepted limitations in sport - for example, the supposed 'home advantage' - are simply instances of mass hypnosis, perpetuated by the media, coaches, team mates, etc, and not really 'true' at all.
Hypnosis and Sport
Hypnosis works because of the existence of the 'conscious' and 'unconscious' minds. Our conscious mind represents only a small fraction of the mind's total potential, and the ability to tap into the unconscious parts of the mind and its resources allows an individual to significantly enhance their performance. Excellence in sport is a combination of unconscious competence, and unconscious confidence. Unconscious competence in the skills of your sport is developed through hours of practice and repetition until the skills are natural and automatic, and most sportspeople spend much of their time training in this way. Every sportsperson knows that you play best when you play 'unconsciously' - when you 'just do it', without conscious trying or striving .... when you are unconsciously competent. So hypnosis - being a method by which one becomes more familiar with the unconscious mind and its resources and abilities - is something sportspeople can greatly benefit from. Further, the 'peak' experience in sport - those times when you are so in the 'zone' you are unbeatable - is essentially a 'trance' state. Through the use of hypnosis, sportspeople can consistently create these type of peak experiences by choice and design, rather than have them happen by chance or accident.

On the other hand, unconscious confidence is a result of parental and social conditioning, and determines your habitual and automatic emotional responses to what others say to you, or about you. Hypnosis can be used to positively program unconscious confidence to replace negative conditioning, or to fill in gaps where there was no positive encouragement as a younger person, and to enhance and amplify the existing positive conditioning.

I've identified five main areas where hypnosis may be of benefit to sportspeople and coaches:

* Performance Enhancement;
* Time distortion;
* Confidence and Self Esteem;
* Pain control;
* Healing of illness and injuries.

Performance Enhancement
Hypnosis may be used in the following ways to enhance athletic performance:

- Increased sensory perception. In hypnosis, sensory perceptions are enhanced and this improved sensory capacity can be transferred to sporting contexts.
- Change unwanted behaviours and habits. Inappropriate and unwanted behaviours that are preventing an athlete from achieving their full potential can be influenced with hypnosis. For example: eating disorders, smoking, alcohol or drug addictions, overly aggressive or disruptive behaviours, and even learning difficulties.
- Unlock latent abilities and reprogram limiting beliefs. One of the most commonly experienced positive consequences of the experience of hypnosis is a changed perception of what is possible, and the surprise of tapping into hitherto unknown resources and abilities, leading to a greater sense of personal confidence and self esteem.
- Role model identification. Trance states may also be utilised to model the skills and behaviours of top players in a given sport, and through this modelling allow an individual to acquire those specific skills and behaviours at an accelerated rate.
Time Distortion
Time distortion is the ability to 'stop' or 'stretch' time - similar to what happens when you experience a life threatening incident and everything, apparently, slows down. I'm sure you've recognised the ability of elite sportspeople to apparently have so much time to get into position and play their shots. Essentially what they're doing is 'stopping' or slowing their perception of time. This can be taught and trained through hypnosis.

Confidence and Self Esteem
Truly it's not what others say to you, but rather, what you say to yourself after they stop talking. The kind of unconscious confidence that we see in champions is a result of not having to think about being confident or trying to talk yourself up - it's a result of having deeply ingrained at an unconscious level an unshakable positive self image and powerful positive self talk that isn't affected by what others say. This can be strengthened through the use of hypnosis.

Pain Control and Healing
Likewise, athletes can be taught pain control techniques to use when under duress, and body healing techniques to speed recovery from both injuries and heavy workouts. Two relatively well known uses for hypnosis in pain control are in dentistry and obstetrics where a trance is induced to allow the dentist to drill a filling, or the mother to give birth, with little or no pain. Surgical operations have even been performed without anaesthetic drugs - the only pain control method used being hypnosis.

Further, recent work in hypnosis has shown that it may be of assistance in healing both chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease, and in recovering from injuries.

Like all hypnotic skills, both pain control and healing require considerable hypnotic training and practice to achieve, but may be learned by anyone with dedicated effort and consistent practice.

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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NLP & Sports

by Joseph O'Connor : reviewed by Jeffrey Hodges

NLP & Sports is a book which may - finally - revolutionise the conservative field of sport psychology, which has for too long ignored the advances made by NLP, relying instead on dubious 'personality' inventories, tedious questionnaires, and impractical theoretical concepts.

Mr. O'Connor begins by noting that "bodies do not compete, people complete - with their body, mind and emotions", and explaining how sportspeople can use NLP to make physical practice more effective; get into the 'zone'; deal with nerves; develop better concentration; and accelerate learning and healing.

The book is divided into seven chapters covering what Mr. O'Connor suggests are the "five keys to peak sports performance" : goals; mental rehearsal; concentration; distractions & anxiety; and learning from performance (including dealing with injuries). While I would add attitude and self concept as equally important (and which are not covered in the book), the content of each chapter is pertinent, practical, and easy to read.

Chapter 2 on goal setting includes precise sports examples which clearly explain his concepts, and I particularly liked how he brings beliefs into the goal setting process - a topic often left till later in most books on psychological skills training (which invariably begin with goal setting). Chapter 3 on mental imagery has a particularly well described explanation of submodalities and their relevance to sports performance, again supported with clear examples - this should be new and useful material for most sports coaches and athletes unfamiliar with NLP. Chapters 4 & 5 deal with concentration and I was impressed with the simplicity of his three principles of concentration : "
1. Concentration is natural and easy. Everyone does it .....
2. We pay attention to significant change, so we can control distractions by what we define as significant.
3. When we focus on what is important to us, distractions disappear automatically ..." (p. 90)

I also found his discussions of personal congruence added a new dimension to the topic of concentration, and one that is especially relevant :
"You cannot force your way into the zone. It is like a shy friend that you have to invite into your house. All you can do is make your home a comfortable place and make your friend welcome." (p. 111)

Chapter 6 deals with emotions and performance anxiety and has some useful ideas for building performance anchors - exercise # 31 on 'Worry into Planning' is well thought out and immediately useful for all athletes. Chapter 7 provides ideas for reprogramming errors and dealing with injuries - including a variation on Steve and Connirea Andreas' healing exercise from Heart of the Mind.

NLP & Sports is carefully referenced, with 36 practical exercises (indexed at the back with an 'exercise finder' for specific problems), a comprehensive glossary of NLP and sport psychology terminology, and an appendix with the obligatory 'eye accessing cues' diagrams and sensory based vocabulary.

While I found nothing 'new' for those trained to practitioner level in NLP, I believe NLP & Sports is worth reading, particularly for those interested in working with sportspeople, and should be essential reading for all coaches and aspiring athletes. NLP purists may raise their eyebrows at his statement that: "The four principles of NLP ... [are] ... good relationships, goal setting, sensitivity and flexibility". Really? According to whom? Frankly, I personally prefer Bandler and Grinder's more universally recognised principles: the map is not the territory; if what you're doing isn't working do something else; the meaning of a communication is the response you get; surface structure and deep structure of communication; etc, etc - however it's good to hear different ways of describing what constitutes NLP, and it may generate some useful debate.

I didn't like the inclusion in the book of a number of 'rate yourself on a scale of 1 - 5' questionnaires of dubious usefulness and questionable veracity - typical of the more traditional sport psych literature which is littered with such tiresome drivel, and from which Mr O'Connor obviously borrowed them. I also found Appendix 1 on Fitness & Exercise totally irrelevant to the rest of the book. What does it have to do with NLP? However, when he sticks to NLP, his writing is fresh and immediately connects with the reader.

All in all, an excellent book well worth reading. It's strength lies in its large repertoire of practical exercises and real life sports examples that are clearly explained and transferable to any sports context.

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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Positive Compulsions: Choose what you're Compelled About

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE COMPULSIONS
How come some people have compulsions for positive behaviours such as regular exercise, healthy food, and fresh air, while others feel compelled to smoke, drink excessively, and spend their time in smoky casinos or in front of the telly? Why is it that for some people it would be almost impossible for them to go through a day without some form of exercise, while for others it seems almost impossible for them to even do 20 minutes of walking?

How come two people can look at a packet of cigarettes and one says, "Mmmm, I've got to have one", and the other person thinks, "Yuck! Lung cancer and death!". How come two people can look at a 10km fun run and one says to themselves, "Yeah, let's do it!", and the other says "It's too hard, I couldn't run that far".

The reason is that both behaviours are a result of what each person has linked enjoyment and difficulty to - what has been called the pleasure / pain principle.

You only ever do anything because you associate more enjoyment and pleasure with doing it, than not doing it. You only ever avoid certain things because you associate more pain and difficulty with doing them, than not doing them.

An excellent analogy to help you understand this concept is simply that of a computer program: people have programmed themselves to associate pleasure and pain to specific things, and the differences in what they associate pleasure and pain to reflect the differences in their behaviour, personal health and fitness, and performances in their life.

Unfortunately, for many people the choice of what means pleasure and what means pain was wired into them at a young age by their parents, peers, or advertisers, and was not chosen consciously or deliberately. Some people have programs that associate exercise with hard work, or a healthy salad with pain and boredom, while chocolate and coffee is associated with pleasure and comfort! Some people even associate cigarette smoking with manliness, independence, and sex appeal - what a con that has been, yet millions have fallen for it! A classic case I worked with was a girl who had associated being sweaty with being unfeminine - programmed in by her mother at a young age - and this had prevented her from achieving the fitness and health goals she wanted! Every time she got sweaty, she felt bad, so she never really exercised properly.
What do you associate pleasure and pain to? How might you program yourself differently in order to achieve what you want - more success in your business, better relationships, or improved health and fitness? What pleasure and pain associations do you think highly successful individuals have made? How might you use this concept to assist your clients to make positive changes in their behaviours?

THE STRUCTURE OF THINKING
However, just understanding the importance of the pleasure / pain principle still doesn't really provide us with the necessary tools to help others to stop smoking, take up regular exercise, or eat a healthy diet. The real key to helping people change unhealthy lifestyle patterns, is to understand the mental structure behind each individual's own pain and pleasure associations.

It's been truly said that one person's pain is another person's pleasure - but how can this be? What does the person do in their mind to make something pleasurable or painful?

A major reason why people don't take action to follow a program of exercise or a healthful diet, is the way they picture and imagine those activities. Yet these same people have no problem acting on unhealthy behaviours such as smoking, over-eating chocolate or junk foods, excessive alcohol indulgence, and so on. This is so because these negative compulsions are pictured and experienced by the person very differently.

Compulsions are only compulsions because of the way you picture, hear and feel them! But what makes a compulsion, compelling? Why do some people just have to have a cigarette, or eat chocolate, or gamble their family's savings away, or bite their fingernails, or get anxious at the sight of a spider?

We act on compulsions as a result of the structure of our subjective experience, the structure of how we think about a particular thing.

SUBMODALITIES
Every behaviour is a consequence of our thinking - everything we do externally must first happen internally, in our mind. If you analyse your thinking you will notice that there is only a limited amount of choice available as to how you think. Basically you've got five choices, as per our five senses: your thinking is made up of seeing images; hearing sounds or words; feeling feelings; and to a lesser extent, smells and tastes.

Everything we do is a result of using these five sensory thinking components - and in particular, the three primary senses of seeing, hearing, and feeling.

Every behaviour, positive or negative, productive or destructive, healthy or unhealthy first begins as a sort of mental 'program' in the individual's mind before it happens. So essentially, the reason why one person sees cigarettes as attractive and another sees them as disgusting, is simply a result of engaging different mental programs. Likewise, the same is true for exercise or eating patterns - people who exercise regularly and eat a healthy diet think differently about exercise and diet, than those who don't exercise and eat junk food.

The only way to effectively change someone's behaviour then, is to get them to change the mental processes which support the behaviour.

The key here is that each of our primary sensory systems also includes numerous submodalities - which are finer distinctions or refinements of that sensory system. For instance, our visual sense has the submodalities of colour, size, brightness, distance, shape, and so on. Our auditory sense has the submodalities of volume, tone, tempo, distance, and so on. Our kinaesthetic sense has the submodalities of texture, temperature, pressure, movement and so on.

Submodalities are really important aspects of our thinking, because by varying the submodalities of a particular thought, even only slightly, you can totally change your response to it. For instance, if you want to be more motivated, or compelled, to achieve a particular goal or outcome, then picture, hear and feel about that outcome in the same way that you picture, hear and feel about something you're absolutely compelled to do.

If you think of a desired goal, and 'see' it in full colour, big and bright, large, and up close directly in front of you; and say to yourself in a loud, confident voice "YES! I want this, now!"; and feel an excitement welling up within you, and a tingling all over your body - that's pretty hard to resist! In contrast, if you 'see' a goal dim, fuzzy, and distant; say to yourself in an unsure tone of voice "I hope I get this"; and feel unsure and cool, then you're probably not going to have much 'go for it'!

Generally, for most people, visual submodalities of compulsion are: large size, close, colourful, 3-D, bright and moving. Auditory compelling submodalities are louder, stereo sounds or voices, close, with resonant tones. Kinaesthetic, (or feeling), submodalities of compulsion are warmer, faster movement, higher intensity and strong rhythm.

However, there can be individual differences. Do the following exercise to identify the submodalitites that are compelling for you.
EXERCISE : Submodalities of Compulsion

1. Think of something you're really compelled to do. A favourite pastime, something you do if you get half a chance. For example it might be an activity like going to the beach, or tinkering with your motorbike, or maybe a favourite TV program you never miss. [Use a positive activity - something you enjoy doing and is not unhealthy or self destructive]

2. Now think of that activity, and as you think of it, notice the visual, auditory and kinaesthetic submodalities of your thoughts. How do you picture the activity? What and how do you talk to yourself about it? And your feelings?

3. Now think of something that you'd like to be more motivated, or compelled to do. Imagine doing it using the same visual, auditory and kinaesthetic submodalities you use for your compulsive activity.

What if you had a compulsion for positive behaviours and empowering emotional states? The difference between a champion and an average person is simply that they have chosen different things to focus on and get excited about - they have compulsions for positive behaviours like eating healthily, fitness training, and feeling good about themselves, instead of smoking, overeating, sloth and feeling lousy!

Teach your clients to make new associations to the positive behaviours you want them to follow, by having them think of exercising in a bright, close, colourful way in their mind, and re-program their negative behaviours by having them see smoking and junk food as small, dull, and uninteresting. Encourage them to speak to themselves in an upbeat, happy and resonant tone when exercising, and think about watching TV in a dull, monotone, boring manner. Have them feel vibrant feelings of energy and warmth coursing rapidly around their body when they exercise and eat healthily, and have prickly feelings of coolness and disgust for smoking and junk food.

By doing this you're not just showing them how to exercise or lead a healthier lifestyle, you're also showing them how to use their thinking to control their own subjective responses and behaviours - something which will have more far reaching positive consequences to their lives as a whole.

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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Balanced Goals

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

Looking around at people in society - and in the sporting community in particular - it's easy to find examples of unbalanced individuals who lead one-dimensional lives. They may have achieved 'success' in their work, or career, or sport; they may be very wealthy - yet they don't seem to be particularly happy.

One of the major philosophies underpinning the entire Sportsmind approach, is that success is all about treating an athlete holistically. Learning to train the mind and emotions as well as training our body. This means that we want to recognise that we have emotions and feelings; that friendship and love and belonging are just as important to being a success, as are well toned muscles, gold medals and financial gain.
One way to understand this important principle of setting balanced goals is to consider a wheel with five spokes. Each of these spokes represents an area of your life.

Spoke 1 is for your personal health and fitness - without this you can't do anything else. Spoke 2 is for your relationships and family life - without which life pretty much loses its meaning. Spoke 3 is for career and sporting goals and other interests - because humans want to have a sense of purpose in life. Spoke 4 is for financial wealth and possessions - because life is a 'pay as you go' process, not a free ride. Spoke 5 is for personal development and contribution - because we all leave a legacy of some kind, be it a help or a hindrance.

So as you review your goals for the year, perhaps you might answer the follwing questions: "What kind of relationships would I like to have with my coach, and team mates?" "What do I want to learn this year?" "How do I want my family to be?" "What would I like to contribute to the wider community this year?"

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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Be Your Own Life Coach

By Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc.(Hons) B.Ed.

Most people live life reacting to events, feeling as though they are acted upon, controlled by other people and external forces. It does not have to be that way. It is possible to feel in charge of your life ... to feel as though you're the one deciding what you do, where you go, who you're with, and how you spend you time. The only way to achieve this is to decide now to design your life!

When designing it's important to consider your life as a five pointed star, with each of the five points representing a different aspect of your life. The first point, at the top, represents your health and fitness - because if you don't have good health, you won't be able to achieve or enjoy anything else. The two side arms of the star are for wealth/possessions on the left, and career/achievements on the right side. The two supporting legs of the star are for personal development/contribution on the left, and relationships/family on the right side - because without a sense of contribution and growth and connection with others, even great achievements feel hollow and meaningless.

So, let's start designing your life ... right now! If you could live where you wanted, do what you wanted, and be the person you most wanted to be, what would that look, sound and feel like? Take the next 15 minutes to write down all your dreams and desires, as if they were really possible for you. Don't be concerned just yet about whether you can achieve something or nor, or how you could go about it - we'll be considering these issues later on. For now, simply get all your dreams down.

To help, you might want to consider :

Where do you want to live?

What kind of home do you want?

What kind of car?

How much income do you want to earn in a year?

How much do you want to have in savings?

What places would you like to visit?

What have you always wanted to learn, or do, that you've never gotten around to yet? What would you like to contribute to our society / the world?

Who do you want to know and be friends with?

How do you want your family to be?

What do you want to weigh, and look like?

How fit do you want to be?

What skills do you want to have?

What do you want to achieve in your career?

What possessions do you yearn for? And so on.

Brainstorm your thoughts and ideas below, and then organise them into the five groupings.

Copyright J. Hodges / Sportsmind Institute 2008

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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Success to S.I.G.N.I.F.I.C.A.N.C.E.

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

Introduction

If you're reading this, you've probably already tasted some success, and are probably among the top 10% or 20% in your chosen sport. However, how can you build upon the successes you've had to really make a significant mark in your sport – to truly stand out from the crowd and leave a legacy as a champion. There have been many talented sportspeople with huge potential – and yet they have not lived up to that potential over time.

Your psychology and your thinking strategies make the difference between someone who just has 'potential', and the person who actually grabs that potential with both hands and makes full use of it in their lives.

So – are you going to become more than just a gifted athlete with lots of potential? I challenge you to actually become outstanding – to become someone who makes a significant contribution to their sport, and to our society.

So, before reading any further, take a few moments to think, now, about what significant achievement you'd like to attain.... then I will take you through a process for how you can actually make it happen.

I've been fortunate to assist with two Olympic Gold medalists, hundreds of national champions and thousands of outstanding athletes and coaches over the past 25 years, and what has absolutely fascinated me is – how does someone take an idea, a wish to say win an Olympic gold medal or a national championship.... and actually make it happen? What are the keys which allow someone to take a dream and turn it into reality?

I suggest there are 12 important principles, or keys, – and I use the word SIGNIFICANCE as an acronym to explain these.

Let's go through them – and as we do, I encourage you to apply each principle to your own dream of significance.

S - State Positively and Precisely What You Want

It's important to know exactly what you want and to focus on what you want, rather than what you DON'T want. Our attention is like a missile guidance system – whatever you focus on, you will move towards. Making your desire precise helps use your unconscious resources to help with the goal, rather than just your conscious will power.

I - Important Reasons

Reasons generally come before actions – rarely does anyone do anything without a 'reason'. So find powerful reasons to achieve what you know exactly what you want want.... rather than excuses NOT to do it! Too often we get caught up in the inevitable challenges and difficulties in our way. However the way to overcome these is to have compelling enough reasons. Write down now half a dozen powerful reasons WHY you want to achieve your goal, and what will it cost you if you DIDN'T achieve it?

G - Turn into Goals

Goals are dreams with a deadline..... and an action plan. WHEN do you want to achieve this by? It's been shown that most people OVERestimate what they can do in 6 months or a year, but UNDER-estimate what they can do in 5 or 10 or 20 years. What is the FIRST STEP? Identify some small thing you can do tonight that will immediately start you on the journey.... And do it!

N - Non-Comparative with Others

Compare how you are today with how you were yesterday, and how you want to be tomorrow. Your competitors are simply yardsticks by which you chart your OWN progress from the past.... to the present.... to the future.

I - Intrinsic Motivation

Do it FOR YOURSELF. Because this is what is in your heart – your heart driven, passion driven desire.... because you LOVE it.

F - Future Self Reference Point

We have a fascination with, and an attachment to, our personal history that is totally unwarranted, and in my opinion, mostly detrimental and limiting to achieving our highest potential. You are NOT just a consequence of the past, but a pre-sequence of a future self who wants to come into being. Use this Future You as a new 'reference point' for decisions/beliefs about yourself, and allow this future self to become your own 'inner coach' and mentor. Most people think they are locked into being a consequence of their past – and it is a seductive belief and can seem very real.... but this is just a default setting on your personal computer. You CAN engage your INTENTION by establishing a relationship with your desired future self – then the past becomes irrelevant, and the future draws you towards itself.

I - Imagine it Happening

Engage the most powerful force in the Universe – your imagination – to ENVISAGE it happening. Just think, if you took just 30 seconds first thing in the morning and 30 seconds last thing at night, and used this time to picture what you wanted.... to kindle the flame of your creative power to INTEND the result you want. If you did that every day for the next six months, do you think that would have an impact? You better believe it will!!

C - Congruent with Your Core Values

There is power in connecting the surface goal you are wanting with the driving core value underneath. We rarely identify the real goal we are actually chasing. People don't want money, or relationships, or possessions.... they want to experience the CORE VALUES those things represent: e.g. security; love; intimacy; freedom; independence; happiness; etc. You can identify your underlying values by using an "outcome chain": Ask yourself "What will this give me that is even MORE important?"

A - Achievable

What you want needs to be achievable – but how do you know? Only YOU can know. As a general rule, if you can't SEE yourself doing it / achieving it, you probably won't. If you can't 'see' it happening, break the goal down to smaller chunks until you can.

N - Never Give Up Mindset

Develop a mindset of PERSISTENCE. Persistence is more powerful than skill or intelligence or good looks. Persistence can get you just about anything you want. How do you develop persistence? Persistence is a mental process which focuses on solutions. Ask yourself : "How CAN I do such and such, or achieve this?", and expect an answer. Your brain is designed as an answer-seeking mechanism, use it wisely. Most people get stuck because they ask the wrong questions.

C - Commit

How do you commit? Establish a routine – something small – and do it every day.

E - Ecology Check

The main reason people don't achieve a specific goal or dream is resistance or sabotage from within themselves. Check for objections WITHIN yourself and WITHOUT from others close and/or important to you or the goal. Are there any 'down' sides? Are you willing to pay the price? Is it worth it? If objections, find a way to either modify the goal, or build a solution to the objection into the process.

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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Five Steps to Coaching Excellence: A New Approach to Personal Training

by Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons)

INTRODUCTION
Personal trainers are sometimes called on to work with elite sportspeople to provide personalised fitness and strength programs for improving their performance, but with a little more thought and preparation your PT business can offer much more to the elite sportsperson. Specifically, when you recognise that most sportspeople - even at the highest level - are only training half of themselves, it's easy to understand how you can offer a more complete, holistic training service.

What if you offered some assistance with mental and emotional preparation for your elite athletes, as well as the strength and aerobic fitness work? Athletes are not just bodies are they? Thoughts and feelings affect sports performances - even more so than physical factors, and how much do you know about training this half of your clients? But then, why would an experienced PT such as yourself bother with the extra training and effort involved in a more complete service to your clients?

Is extra money a good enough incentive? Recognise that elite level sportspeople spend millions of dollars a year worldwide on sports related services in an attempt to gain that competitive edge over their rivals - and this is on the increase. Further, elite level sportspeople - particularly in golf, tennis and football - earn enough to pay handsomely for your services, and are willing to do so on a long term basis. How often have you had clients for a few sessions, then never hear from them again?

How about the prestige associated with working with the best athletes in the world? Does that turn it on for you? The opportunity is currently here. There is a huge market of elite level sportspeople needing this more complete personal training service. I believe it is the next logical step in the evolution of PT.

Would working with clients who genuinely want to improve do it for you? Have you ever had the experience of 'backsliding' clients? Or clients who 'say' that they want to lose weight, or get fitter, but keep missing appointments, or who lose their motivation? Elite athletes are professional sportspeople - playing sport is their livelihood, their business, so they are more committed and motivated. They are a joy to work with - particularly if you're used to working a lot with 'average' 9 to 5'ers.

So have I excited you about a huge potential new client base, and a new way of working with your old client base yet? Stay with me, because the next question you're going to ask is "How can I do it?" Which is of course, the meat of this article - how to understand the unique needs of elite sportspeople, and how to develop your skills in five key areas of the new approach to Personal Training. How to deal with the Mind Matters of Personal Training.

A WINNING ATTITUDE
The first of these keys is to encourage a winning attitude in your clients. Now someone with a winning attitude is not someone who is merely obsessed with victory, but rather someone who has : a solution oriented focus; asks the right questions of themselves; and has powerful, positive self talk.

A solution oriented focus is all about looking for the answers, rather than focusing on the problems. You can encourage this in what you do with your clients, and how you communicate with them.
Rather than dwelling on 'problems', encourage them to consider solutions - how did they overcome a similar situation previously? What do they need to do to move forward?

Which leads into asking the right questions doesn't it? How often have you heard why(n)ing questions from your clients? Why can't I lose weight? What's wrong with me? Why am I so unfit? Why can't I get motivated?

The trouble with these kinds of questions is that even if you get the answer, you're still not left with a solution! This, of course, is the problem with traditional psychotherapy! Who cares where the 'problem' comes from - what your clients want is to know how to get out of it! So help them out by encouraging them to ask 'How' questions. How can I do such and such, and enjoy the process? How can I stay motivated? What can I do to achieve this step towards my goal? How can I stay on my healthy diet and exercise program?

Of course, this is supported by encouraging powerful, positive self talk in your clients. Of course you can do it! Stick with it! You'll make it! You deserve success. You've got what it takes. Perservere. Persist. All champions do.

POSITIVE MOTIVATION AND HIGH ACHIEVEMENT STRATEGIES
Goal setting is an obvious characteristic of elite sportspeople, and you've no doubt heard about goal setting ad nauseam! So I won't belabour the obvious here, but rather note a couple of things about goals of which you may not be aware.

Firstly, do you understand how and why goals work?

There is a part of the brain known as the RAS (reticular activating system) which, in simple terms, controls what we pay attention to. It does this unconsciously, based on what we have consciously decided is important to us.

For example, I recently decided to purchase a new car, and after a few weeks of looking around had decided on a particular brand and model. In the next few weeks prior to my purchasing the new vehicle, I saw that particular kind of car everywhere - whereas previously I had never even noticed them! I'm sure something similar has happened to you - either when choosing bricks or tiles for a new house, a new piece of business equipment, or whatever.

As soon as we consciously decide some particular thing is important to us, then our RAS filters the environment around us, unconsciously, and triggers our attention to items related to that particular thing. Without clear goals, this process cannot happen, and so the individual without goals doesn't notice the opportunities that someone with goals does automatically.

The other important thing about goals is that for someone to actively work towards a particular goal, they have to have a powerful enough reason. Particularly in elite level sport! Every athlete gets to a point in their training when they ask themselves "Why am I doing this?" If they don't have clear, unambiguous and powerful reasons to answer that question, then they will give up, and do something else.

So you can aid your clients be pre-asking this question, and having them list a number of clear reasons for you. Then, whenever their motivation is flagging, you can say: "Remember X? Remember what you're doing this for!"

Having clear, powerful reasons makes the difference between someone who is 'playing' sport, and a sports professional. Having powerful reasons makes the difference between someone who takes action on their goals and dreams, and someone who remains a dreamer.

BUILDING POSITIVE SELF CONCEPT
Self belief, in my opinion, is the single most essential characterising trait of the champion athlete. However, like motivation, concentration, a positive attitude, and so on, it's a learned behaviour - and one which you can help build in your clients.

Without doubt the biggest influence upon self belief and self confidence is the ability to cope with mistakes, failures, poor performances, and outright rejection in your life. Everyone can believe in themselves when things are going well! It's only when the chips are down and your back is to the wall that your underlying self belief is really tested, and either found wanting, or is strengthened by the adversity.

Obviously, positive self belief is closely linked to, and supported by, positive self talk. However, there is one key area that is often overlooked in building self belief, and that is one's attitude to errors, and there is an excellent strategy that I've developed which I call the ARIA technique which is extremely valuable that you can teach to your clients.

I'll explain this in detail in the article, together with the other two key areas : Emotional Management and Visualisation Techniques. [If you can't wait then please refer to my Sportsmind book, pages 33 - 35]

About Jeffrey Hodges B.Sc.(AES) M.Sc.(Hons)
Jeffrey Hodges is a performance consultant to elite athletes, sporting teams and corporate clients. He is the author of the widely acclaimed "Sportsmind - An Athlete's Guide to Superperformance Through Mental & Emotional Training" and "Champion Thoughts, Champion Feelings"; creator of the Sportsmind performance enhancement workshops and audio tapes; and Director of the Sportsmind Institute for Human Performance Research.

He is a NLP Master Practitioner and Associate Trainer, and his Sportsmind programs have been endorsed by the NSW Dept Sport & Recreation, and recommended by top sportsclubs and successful athletes. Jeffrey has competed in many sports, notably Volleyball, Squash, Soccer and Golf, and currently trains in Aikido, holding a black belt.

Some of his clients to date include :
Australian Rugby Union
St. Joseph's College
Woodlands Golf Club
Financial Institutions Remuneration Group (FIRG)
Societe Generale
Qld. Swimming
Network for Fitness Professionals
North Sydney and Penrith Rugby League Clubs
Qld. Athletics Assn
NSW Netball Assn
Northern Inland Academy of Sport
Victorian Soaring Assn
Orange Agricultural College Equestrian School
Qld and NSW Departments of Sport and Recreation
Qld Academy of Sport
and the RAAF.

For more information, contact :
SPORTSMIND , 77 FLAXTON MILL ROAD
FLAXTON Qld. Australia. 4560.
PHONE 61 7 5445 7994
email : jh@sportsmind.com.au
website : www.sportsmind.com.au

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